U.S. Army Divisional HQ Troops, WWI (and other cav)

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Pat Holscher
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A question has been posted on the Ukans WWI list about Division Headquarters Troops. The posted query was this:
Can anyone give me any information about what exactly the Headquarters Troop was in an AEF division? Were they actually troopers (horsemen) ? How large was the unit, on average, and what were its functions?
Based on prior queries on this topic, I've assumed these units did not have horses in actuality, although there's some suggestion that perhaps they did. In response, the original poster noted:
The division I'm researching is the 33rd, AEF, a National Guard division. In reading the history of the division, I find a good many references to a "Headquarters Troop", but no descriptions of it -- no indication as to size or function. Generally, when the division was in transit, the Headquarters Troop travelled with Division Hdqtrs, Headquarters Train & the MPs, and this was a group that went by motor vehicles, according to the Movement Tables, which makes me wonder whether Hdqtrs Troop has nothing to do with horses, or if they travelled with Div Hdqtrs, etc, but on horseback, even though everyone else in the group rode in vehicles. The only information I can discover about them in the divisional Order of Battle is that they were commanded by a Capt.
We've explored this a bit here, but I'm really curious. What do we know about these units. Did they have horses in any division, all divisions? Was this something that would have been fleshed out in 1919, but hadn't yet come to pass?

I know the plan was to organize the US division along the French lines, and to incorporate organic cavalry within them, but I'm under the impression that this did not occur. Did it?

Pat


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Some further replies on the WWI list state the following:

> The table of organization of an AEF division called for a
> mounted headquarters troop (equivalent to a infantry company) of cavalry
> for scouting purposes. In fact, some divisions did not have such an
> outfit. Some Corps also had a several cavalry troops or a cavalry
> squadron attached. See _The Order of Battle_.


I'm looking at the tables of organization for an Infantry Division
(Combat) in the back of ORDER OF BATTLE OF UNITED STATES LAND FORCES IN
THE WORLD WAR AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES DIVISIONS (1931), and the
only cavalry units listed are:

May 3, 1917 organization - one cavalry regiment (1,579)

July 15, 1917 provisional organization - none

August 8, 1918 recommended organization - "one squadron of Corps Cavalry
attached to a division"

November 11, 1918 organization - ditto

CAVALRY REGIMENTS OF THE US ARMY, by James A. Sawicki (1985) states:

"When a need for mounted cavalry existed among the divisions of the AEF,
French or English units were usually attached. During the Oise-Aisne
campaign the French 10th Dragoons were attached to the 77th Division and
a squadron from the French 1st Moroccan Cavalry Division was attached to
the 32d Division. During the Somme offensive, squadrons from the British
20th Hussars were attached to the 27th and 30th Divisions. And during
the Meuse-Argonne offensive a squadron from the French 2d Cavalry
Regiment was attached to the 35th Division while elements of the French
132d Cavalry Regiment were attached to the 37th Division."

Also, four dismounted regiments of US Cavalry made it overseas: 3rd (Oct
1917), 2d, 6th and 16th (Mar 1918).

The only unit to see action in a mounted capacity seems to have been a
provisional formed from Troops B, D, F and H of the 2d Cavalry; which
was attached to 1st Division on 1 Sep 1918.

In the context of 'troop', I believe this was the US equivalent of an
infantry company (albeit much smaller in numbers); while a 'squadron'
was the equivalent of an infantry battalion (although again much smaller
in numbers).
Again, this topic has been brought up here before, and it seems to be the consensus that only the 2d made it over, as cavalry. Here the 3d, 6th and 16th are also mentioned Did they make it over to France intact, and as cavalry?

And what about these Headquarters troops? What were they, and did they have their horses?


Pat
Gary Reavell
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Pat,

(This is the short version of a complex subject.)

In my experience and knowledge, British Army in general but not exclusively, a Headquarters anything (be it HQ Platoon, HQ Troop, HQ Company, HQ Squadron, etc) was made up of those elements required to:

a. Provide direct support to the HQ to allow it to do its business (such as communications to subordinate and superior sub-units and formations).

b. Support operations of the unit/formation to which the HQ belongs. To this, second, end it contains all those elements that would lose their effectiveness if further subdivided (such as supply) or are not required at all times by sub-units (such as mechanical engineers) or valuable troops that the commander wishes to retain under his direct command for deployment as seen fit to support the operational function of the unit/formation as a whole.

The latter category would cover valuable battle-winning assets of which cavalry, particularly in the recce role, would obviously be viewed as a major part (this is not to devalue any other element such as artillery, signals, medics or chefs).

Given that formations (those operational combat groupings that are made up of non-organic units or sub-units) and sometimes units have units or sub-units attached from their higher formation for specific operations or phases of such, the Order Of Battle of any given formation, unit or sub-unit would change. This may be a frequent occurrence depending on the phase of operations. As the original question was about a Divisional HQ, it may be difficult to state exactly what its makeup was unless the researcher has access to the Div HQ's war diaries which should list any units or elements attached or detached on any given day. Those assets available to the Div Commander would vary as his higher commanders (Corps, Army) would manipulate his forces as required by the overall plan.

And before this turns into a Staff College precis, I shall finish and hope it creates more light than heat.

Gary

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Here's some additional comments on this topic from the WWI list:
Is this not the equivalent of the Divisional Cavalry found in British units ? If the OC was a Captain that would suggest a unit of cavalry troop size.

However, one must question its function in 1918 both because of the nature of warfare then, and because of the lack of available horses. As the movement of men across the Atlantic was made a priority, it fell to the other Allies to provide horses. Thus British artillery teams were reduced from six horses to four, and cavalry regiments received bicycles. The latter was not confined to British reserve units; the Yorkshire Dragoons being one example of a cavalry regiment that fought as cyclists in 1918.

If the AEF Divisional HQs were mechanised, would it not be reasonable to assume that the HQ Troop was also ? Therefore, perhaps, the HQ Troop was on motorbikes ?

One can understand why Pershing wanted cavalry. Cavalry were the only mobile means of exploiting a breakthrough, and Pershing wanted the AEF to function as a homogenous force rather than be broken up to provide reinforcements to other Allied units. With such a desire paramount, it is clear that Pershing would have been reluctant to rely on the availability of British cavalry.
Just received this explanation of Hdqtrs 'Troop from a member of the 'Lost Generation' forum. This appears to wrap it up.

"Dreadnought" writes:

The HQ Troop was a creation of the first US divisional structure in 1917. It was the Divisional unit that provided the direct support services for HQ operations - e.g. the hq commandant, coordinating local support for the HQ, translators, etc. It had approx. 110 personnel authorized.
They weren't mounted - the US Army has always gone back and forth with the use of the term "company" or "troop" for that echelon of command between platoon and battalion. In this case we called it a troop; probably because Pershing was a cavalry officer.

This would also explain why the poet, 1stLt Wyeth, wrote several sonnets about Hdqtrs Troop. He was the divisional translator and therefore was evidently a member of Hdqtrs Troop himself.
Interesting observation on motorcycles in an AEF division.

The nominal equipment roster of a 28,000-man AEF division included 6,638 horses and mules, 577 trucks, 122 motor cars, 319 motorcycles with sidecars, 41 motor ambulances and 64 tractors.* Half a division's artillery was horse drawn; half pulled by tractors or trucks. (But, I still have problems envisioning either cavalry or motorcycle troops operating as scouting forces in a country side pitted with shell holes, crisscrossed with trenches and covered with interlocking machine gun fire.)

Now, did each division always have this compliment of motive power? Or course not.

And, in AEF divisions the traditional role of cavalry as a quick-reaction force was taken over by lorry-mounted machine gun battalions (of which each division had three), at least in operational theory. At the end of the war, the CEF used much the same concept.

Both the British and French armies were short, very short of animal traction, still the main means of overland motive power in WWI. So, I assume that shipments of horses and mules from the Americas had high trans-Atlantic shipping priority. If the availability of equine replacements was limited in 1917-18, so too was the supply of motor vehicles. Detroit, even then the major world manufacturer of motor cars and trucks, continued to produce civilian motor cars throughout the conflict and failed massively to expand production as it did in 1941-45.


__________________________
*Source: The American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, John Votaw, Osprey, 2005.
I thought HQ troops were a mix of reconnaissance (mounted), Provost Marshalls, Military Police (for traffic control) signalers (I don’t know how big a Divisional signaling section was, but a Corps one is illustrated in Andy Simpson’s book on Corps and it took up a large farmhouse with all its outbuildings!) They must have been mainly LofC troops as during the Kaiserslacht the HQ troops at Arras were put into trenches with rifles and that was so unusual that it was a major cause for comment.
The AEF purchased horses and mules from the French. I don't know the numbers, but I believe they were significant. So they were not solely dependent on overseas shipments from America.

My grandad, a muleteer with the 2d Division AEF, after he had been in France for a while, found himself with mules who didn't understand English commands -- they would only respond to commands in French.
I'm starting to piece together a possible explanation here.

A member of the Lost Generation Forum wrote:

~~~ The HQ Troop was a creation of the first US divisional structure in 1917. It was the Divisional unit that provided the direct support services for HQ operations - e.g. the hq commandant, coordinating local support for the HQ, translators, etc. ....... They weren't mounted - the US Army has always gone back and forth with the use of the term "company" or "troop" for that echelon of command between platoon and battalion. In this case we called it a troop; probably because Pershing was a cavalry officer


Then a member of the Society of the Military Horse wrote:

~~~ In my experience and knowledge, British Army in general but not exclusively, a Headquarters anything (be it HQ Platoon, HQ Troop, HQ Company, HQ Squadron, etc) was made up of those elements required to: Provide direct support to the HQ to allow it to do its business (such as communications to subordinate and superior sub-units and formations).


The poet I'm researching, 1stLt JA Wyeth, was Divisional Translator. So according to the first respondent above, he could have been a member of Headquarters Troop himself (several of his sonnets describe activities of the Hdqtrs Troop). Then the second respondent above mentions that a Headquarters unit, including a "Troop", was often involved in communications to sub-units and formations. At this point I say ...Ah! Several of Wyeth's longer linked-sonnet pieces involve description of his own activities delivering messages, or maps, from Divisional Headquarters to front-line units. This sometimes involved journeys of 20 or 30 kilometers.
On one occasion he rode in a staff car with an enlisted man as his driver. During part of this mission, he and his driver went on foot in search of a battalion headquarters, and were close enough to the front that they were subjected to bombing from the sky, artillery fire and gas. He never mentioned what he was carrying, but he first visited the headquarters of a regiment, then the headquarters of two battalions belonging to that regiment.
On another occasion he traveled to the headquarters of a front-line regiment by motorcycle, with an enlisted man driving and he in the sidecar, for the purpose of delivering.maps.

So at this point I'm leaning toward the explanation that the Hdqtrs Troop of the 33rd Div AEF was not mounted, that it included the divisional translator (Lt Wyeth), among others, and was used, among other purposes, for communication between Div Hdqtrs and subordinate units.
In checking over a roster of officers from the 33rd Div, AEF, I found the following under the heading, "Hdqtrs Troop"

Capt William W. Styles, Cav.
1st Lt. Thomas J. Cochrane, Cav..
2nd Lt. Richard R. Notter, Cav.

So the three officers in charge of Headquarters Troop were cavalry officers!

And since they don't list the Divisional Translator, who was also a 1st Lt, I'm guessing that this Headquarters Troop, in any case, really was a cavalry unit, and not the type of unit described below:

~~~ The HQ Troop was a creation of the first US divisional structure in 1917. It was the Divisional unit that provided the direct support services for HQ operations - e.g. the hq commandant, coordinating local support for the HQ, translators, etc. ....... They weren't mounted - the US Army has always gone back and forth with the use of the term "company" or "troop" for that echelon of command between platoon and battalion. In this case we called it a troop; probably because Pershing was a cavalry officer
I believe that "Dreadnought" has it right, notwithstanding the fact that in the case of the 33d Division the three officers of the headquarters troop happened to be Cavalry officers. Under the National Defense Act of 1916 the Cavalry consisted of twenty-five regiments. Divisional headquarters troops were in excess of these. Headquarters troops were originally created with a view to correcting the fault of detaching part of the divisional cavalry for headquarters duties.

The composition of a division of all arms was prescribed in Field Service Regulations, 1905, 1910, and 1913. The 1913 edition provides that:

"The headquarters of brigades and higher units are provided with suitable guards, and the commanders of such guards are vested with the authority to establish, arrange and command the headquarters camps. They direct the movements of, and furnish the guards for, the headquarters trains, and preserve order at headquarters."

"In the field one squadron of the divisional cavalry of each division is, as a rule, detailed as provost guard, small guards being detached therefrom for duty at division headquarters and at the headquarters of the infantry brigades. The squadron commander acts as provost marshal of the division. He has charge of the division postal service and performs duties similar to those of the provost marshal general of a field army. The commanders and staffs of brigades, divisions, and field armies are provided with orderlies from the headquarters guards."

When tables of organization were extracted from Field Service Regulations and published separately for the first time, in 1914, only a handful of infantrymen and cavalrymen were permitted to be detached from their units to serve as guards and orderlies at division headquarters.

Under authority of the National Defense Act of 1916 two new mounted units were created for the infantry division in place of the field expedients mentioned above: the headquarters troop and the train headquarters and military police. Both types of mounted unit were in excess of the twenty-five regiments of cavalry prescribed in 1916.

I don't know if headquarters troops were considered part of the Cavalry or not, but my uncle was an M.P. in the Yankee Division and his unit history contains no suggestion that his unit belonged to the Cavalry. It was originally supposed to be almost entirely mounted, so that fact alone wouldn't seem to be dispositive. It was late in the war before his unit possessed any horses, but that's another story.

I don't believe that Pershing's wishes had anything to do with the headquarters security unit being called a troop, and I would quibble with the statement that the Army has vacillated in its use of the terms company and troop. Rather, I would say that there was a period of about fifty years in which the two terms were more or less interchangeable. The Cavalry was abolished in the 1815 reduction of the Army. When it was revived in 1833 as the 1st Dragoons, the enabling legislation directed that a regiment of ten "companies" be raised. The terms squadron and troop were made official and exclusive in 1883, before Pershing had graduated from West Point.

Incidentally, during the war, interpreters and translators were attached to the general staff section of division headquarters. They didn't belong to the division headquarters troop - although the distinction is probably immaterial.
[/quote]
This is all very much to the point and most useful.

As to whether HQ Troops were considered part of the Cavalry, I have two
histories of the U.S. Cavalry here which cover the WWI years, and when
discussing which units were sent to France, neither history makes any
mention of HQ Troops attached to AEF divisions.

I am unclear about a couple of things, so here are a few questions for the
list:

When were HQ Troops first created? In 1916? Or did the Nat Def Act of 1916
reform an already existing HQ Troop into a new form? If they were
originally formed by detaching part of the divisional cavalry, were the
original HQ Troops mounted? "Dreadnought" believes they were not mounted
as part of AEF divisions in France. If they were unmounted, why would
their officers be cavalry officers?

How large, more or less, was the HQ Troop?

Did they have other duties beyond providing security? How did their
security functions differ from those of the MPs?
[/quote]
Each AEF division had on its table of organization a 260- to 480-man Field Signals Battalion.

The AEF Divisional Headquarters Troop was not necessarily the same as the Reconnaissance Troop. if the division had one.
Votaw (Osprey 2005) lists the HQ component (he does not specify Company or Troop) of an AEF Division numbering 245 men.as of 1918. The numbers for a 1917 division were slightly different.
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Here's the 1st Division TOE for 1917. I don't see a Headquarters Troop in it. Should I expect to see it here?

topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=5711
Originally posted by Couvi
<br />Couvi sent us the Word file on this. I'll upload it later, as it includes charts, etc., but to start with here's the text, but without the proper formatting that his document includes:

UNITED STATES IN THE WORLD WAR
1917-1919

BULLETINS, G.H.Q., A.E.F.

HISTORICAL DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON, DC 1948

GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, A.E.F
GENERAL ORDERS No. 14 France, July 15, 1917

1. The organization of the First Division, as approved by the War Department, is given in the tables attached:

(a) Provisional Infantry Brigade. This table is the organization of company, machine gun company, battalion, regiment and brigade is shown,

(b) Provisional Infantry Division-Trains.

(c) Provisional Infantry Division, including trains.

(d) Changes in Table 6, tables of Organization, 1917, in Field Artillery organizations for Expeditionary divisions.

(e) Changes in Table 8, tables of Organization, 1917, in Field Artillery organizations for Expeditionary divisions.

(f) Divisional Ammunition Train, Motor Section.

(g) Divisional Ammunition Train, Horsed Section.

2. The Headquarters of Trains and Military Police is organized as in Table 28, Table of Organizations, 1917, with the addition of 2 rolling kitchens and 2 wagoners,

The Supply Trains (sic) is organized as in Table 32, Tables of Organization, 1917, with the addition of two rolling kitchens.

The Sanitary Train is organized as in Table 51, Tables of Organization, 1917, with the addition of six rolling kitchens.

The Engineer Train is organized as in Table 35, Tables of Organization, 1917, with the pontoon section and plus one rolling kitchens.

3. Although the approved allowance of Engineers for the provisional Expeditionary division was placed at one battalion of engineers, an entire regiment of Engineers was ordered to accompany the first expedition.

4. The organization shown in the attached tables was approved by the War Department for the first Expeditionary Division. Recommendations as to the final organization of divisions and higher units will be made to the War Department by these headquarters.

5. The organization of the Infantry regiment for combat is based on the strength later be increased to four infantry companies of 250 men each, and that the machine gun company will be increased to 172.

THE INFANTRY REGIMENT COMBAT ORGANIZATION

Based upon the strength given in table of Organization “a,” the following combat organization is prescribed for the Infantry Regiment:

(A) Headquarters:
1 Colonel
1 Lieutenant-Colonel.

(B) Headquarters Company:
1. Staff, Orderlies and Band Section.
Regular Detachment.
2 Captains (1 Adjutant and 1 Commander of Headquarters Co.).
1 Regimental Sergeant Major.
1 First Sergeant.
2 Color Sergeants.
1 Mess Sergeants
1 Supply Sergeant.
1 Stable Sergeant.
1 Sergeant.
4 Corporals.
1 Horseshoer.
3 Cooks.
15 Privates.
Band. 28 All grades.
Battalion Detachment:
3 Battalion Sergeants Major.
27 Privates.

2. Signal Section.
Regimental Detachment:
1 Lieutenant, Commander.
2 Sergeants.
2 Corporals.
Battalion Detachments.
3 Sergeants.
6 Corporals.
30 Privates.

3. Sapper Bomber Section.
Regimental Detachment:
1 Lieutenant, Commander.
2 Sergeants.
4 Corporals.
30 Privates.

4. Sapper Pioneers.
Regimental Detachment:
1 Lieutenant, Commander.
2 Sergeants.
1 Corporal.
36 Privates.

5. 1-Pounder Platoon.
Headquarters:
1 Lieutenant.
5 Privates-drivers and liaison.
3 Gun Squads,--Each squad organized as follows:
7 Privates.
1 Sergeant.
1 Corporal.
1 Gunner-driver.
1 Loader.
4 Ammunition carriers.
1 Driver.

(C) Supply Company:
1 Captain, Commanding.
1 Lieutenant.
1 1st Sergeant.
1 Mess Sergeant.
1 Supply Sergeant.
1 Stable Sergeant.
2 Sergeants.
1 Corporal.
5 Horseshoers.
2 Mechanics.
2 Saddlers.
61 Wagoners.
2 Cooks.
30 Privates
Medical Department and Chaplain
5 Officers
33 Enlisted Men

NOTE:--Headquarters Company. Of the 15 privates of the regimental detachment 10 are to be mounted and 5 are to have motorcycles.
Of the 9 privates of each battalion detachment, 2 are to be mounted, 3 are to have motorcycles and 4 are signalers.
Signal Section. The regimental detachment is divided into the telephone squad of 1 sergeant, 2 corporals and 10 privates and a signal squad of 1 sergeant and 8 privates.
Sapper Bomb Section. This section is charged with the low power trench mortars and pneumatic bomb throwers, grenade depots, fireworks, etc.
Sapper Pioneer Section. The regimental and battalion detachments are destined for diverse expert pioneer work such as construction of posts of command, depots for material, preparation of pioneer material, etc.
Supply Company. Four additional wagoners will later be required to drive the 4 additional ammunition wagons to be supplied.

BATTALION OF INFANTRY

Battalion.
Battalion headquarters.
3 Infantry companies.
1 Machine Gun Company.

Battalion Headquarters.
2 Officers.
4 Sergeants.
3 Corporals.
3 Lance Corporals.
42 Privates

Organization.
1 Major, Commanding.
1 Lieutenant, Adjutant.
From Headquarters Company:
1 Battalion Sergeant Major, mounted.
1 Battalion Supply Sergeant, mounted.
Signal detachment (telephone):
1 Sergeant. (From Hq. Co.)
2 Corporals. (From Hq. Co.)
10 Privates. (From Hq. Co.)
Sapper Pioneers:
1 Corporal. (From Hq. Co.)
8 Privates. (From Hq. Co.)

1 Sergeant, Liaison (From Battalion Machine Gun Co.).
9 Privates
2 Orderlies, mounted. (From Hq. Co.)
3 Motorcyclists. (From Hq. Co.)
4 Signallers (sic). (From Hq. Co.)
Liaison Messengers.
3 Lance Corporals. (From Inf. Co’s of the Bn.).
12 Privates. (From Inf. Co’s of the Bn.).
3 Privates-Battalion Sanitary Service (From Inf. Co’s of the Bn.).
From Battalion Machine Gun Co.
1 Private-Battalion Sanitary Service

NOTE: --All enlisted personnel of battalion headquarters is drawn from regimental headquarters company or from companies of the battalion.

INFANTRY COMPANY

Strength.
4 Officers.
11 Sergeants.
17 Corporals.
2 Mechanics.
3 Cooks.
2 Buglers.

Privates
165 1st Class.
165 Privates.

Organization.
Captain’s Group:
1 Corporal (Liaison).
2 Buglers. (Liaison).
1 Private, Cyclist (Liaison).
5 Privates (2 signallers et 3 observers).
4 Privates (pioneers)
4 Privates (Liaison Messengers).
1 Lance Corporal (For duty as Liaison messengers at Battalion headquarters).
4 Privates (For duty as Liaison messengers at Battalion headquarters).
1 Private (First Aid with Battalion Surgeon.).
Combat train group:
1 Mess Sergeant.
3 Cooks.
1 Private (Captain’s orderly).
Field train group:
1 Supply Sergeant.
2 Mechanics.

4 Platoons

NOTE.—The Platoons are organized alike. Each platoon is divided into two half platoons, consisting of two groups each. (Platoons and Half Platoons are section and demi-sections in the French regulations.)

THE PLATOON

Strength.
1 Lieutenant or 1st Sergeant (Commander).
2 Sergeants (Commanders of half platoons).
4 Corporals (group leaders).
36 Privates.

1st Half Platoon:
Commander-Sergeant (Grenadier or auto-rifleman).
1st Group: (Hand Grenades).
1 Corporal (Grenadiers)
7 Privates (Grenadiers)

2nd Group: (Auto-rifles)
1 Corporal
6 Privates (2 gunners and 4 ammunition carriers).

2nd Half Platoon:
Commander-Sergeant (rifleman).
3rd Group: (Riflemen).
1 Corporal
11 Privates (8 riflemen, 2 rifle grenadiers and 1 ammunition carrier).
4th Group: (Riflemen).
1 Corporal
12 Privates (9 riflemen, 2 rifle grenadiers and 1 ammunition carrier).

NOTE.—The strength (200) of the Company given in Table “a” does not admit of using all 12 of the automatic rifles. Four will therefore be kept in reserve until the strength of company is augmented.



BATTALION MACHINE GUN COMPANY

Strength.
5 Officers.
14 Sergeants.
15 Corporals.
2 Buglers.
130 Privates.
1 Horseshoer.
6 Mechanics.
1 Saddler.
3 Cooks.

Organization.
Captain’s Group:
1 First Sergeant.
1 Supply Sergeant.
1 Sergeant (Liaison).
2 Buglers (Captain’s Orderlies).
1 Private (First Aid with Battalion Surgeon).
Combat Train Group:
1 Lieutenant.
1 Stable Sergeant.
1 Mess Sergeant.
1 Horseshoer.
1 Saddler
3 Cooks.
3 Corporals (Transport, Platoon Ammunition).
3 Platoons.

NOTE.—Each platoon consists of two section of two guns each, with the necessary men and matèriel to serve them. All platoons are organized alike.






By Command of General Pershing,

James G. Harbord
Chief of Staff.
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This photo was taken by Philip S:

Image

I'll let Philip fill in the details here, but he indicates:
Original posted by Philip Sauerlender

I have attached a picture of the memorial stone of the Headquarters Troop 28th Division on the grounds of the PA Military Museum at Boalsburg, PA. The headquarters troop was the only portion of the PA Guard cavalry (1st PA Cavalry) which remained mounted in WWI. They were formed from the Sunbury troop.
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Last edited by Pat Holscher on Thu May 01, 2008 8:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Originally posted by Pat Holscher
This photo was taken by Philip S:

Image

I'll let Philip fill in the details here, but he indicates:
Original posted by Philip Sauerlender

I have attached a picture of the memorial stone of the Headquarters Troop 28th Division on the grounds of the PA Military Museum at Boalsburg, PA. The headquarters troop was the only portion of the PA Guard cavalry (1st PA Cavalry) which remained mounted in WWI. They were formed from the Sunbury troop.
Pat
Philip, very interesting. This information would suggest that at least some divisions did indeed retain a mounted troop.

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I must say, this is very intersting. It appears that here we have a species of U.S. mounted troop in WWI, in at least some numbers, that we've previously overlooked.

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From the WWI list:
I'm endeavoring to put all the different bits of information together on this topic. We now appear to have conclusive evidence that the Hdqtrs Troop of 28th Division was mounted. And with that definite example, I am going to bet that Hdqtrs Troop of 33rd Div was also mounted, given that its officers were all cavalry.

Which leads to another question. In those Hdqtrs Troops that were mounted, what were their duties? In the Field Service Regs of 1913/1916 (thanks to the Neal O'Brien for this) it is prescribed that the Hdqtrs Troop is to be used primarily for guarding, directing movements, and preserving order. Do we think this is the extent of what they were used for, or is there any indication somewhere that they may also have been used for reconnaissance or courier duties?

I have become a little lost in the flood of documents and information. Has it become clear how large the standard Hdqtrs Troop was? Any educated guesses as to how fully the troop was equipped with mounts?

Thanks to everyone. This has been very helpful indeed.
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From the WWI list:

> I have become a little lost in the flood of documents and information.
> Has it become clear how large the standard Hdqtrs Troop was? Any
> educated guesses as to how fully the troop was equipped with mounts?

Alas, no mention or TOE of divisional headquarters troop in VOLUME I
ORGANIZATION OF THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES from the CD previously
mentioned, not even in the "Tables of Organization of the Infantry
Division, Series A, January 18, 1918, corrected to June 26, 1918 (with
an Appendix giving certain tables of August 8, 1917)"

But, under "Tables of Organization, Corps Troops Series B" I did find
the table of organization for 'Headquarters Troop, Army Corps'

total personnel: 6 officers, 315 enlisted men

It appears to be broken down into
'Guard, etc., Personnel' with 6 officers, 114 enlisted men 'Personnel for use with staff, etc.'
- commanding general's section - 10 enlisted men
- general staff section - 87 enlisted men
- adjutant general's section - 20 enlisted men
- inspector general's section - 5 enlisted men
- judge advocate general's section - 4 enlisted men
- quartermaster's section - 9 enlisted men
- surgeon's section - 9 enlisted men
- engineer's section - 11 enlisted men
- gas service section - 3 enlisted men
- ordnance section - 4 enlisted men
- signal section - 15 enlisted men
- artillery section - 20 enlisted men
- provost marshal's section - 4 enlisted men

equipment for troop is
- 1 car, closed (QMC)
- 2 car, light (QMC)
- 1 car, touring (QMC)
- 3 motorcycles with sidecar (QMC)
- 3 motorcycles (QMC)
- 10 trucks, motor (QMC)
- 88 horses, riding
- 120 rifles
- 99 pistols
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Originally form the Ukans WWI list


mentioned, not even in the "Tables of Organization of the Infantry
Division, Series A, January 18, 1918, corrected to June 26, 1918 (with
an Appendix giving certain tables of August 8, 1917)"

But, under "Tables of Organization, Corps Troops Series B" I did find
the table of organization for 'Headquarters Troop, Army Corps'

total personnel: 6 officers, 315 enlisted men

It appears to be broken down into
'Guard, etc., Personnel' with 6 officers, 114 enlisted men 'Personnel for use with staff, etc.'
- commanding general's section - 10 enlisted men
- general staff section - 87 enlisted men
- adjutant general's section - 20 enlisted men
- inspector general's section - 5 enlisted men
- judge advocate general's section - 4 enlisted men
- quartermaster's section - 9 enlisted men
- surgeon's section - 9 enlisted men
- engineer's section - 11 enlisted men
- gas service section - 3 enlisted men
- ordnance section - 4 enlisted men
- signal section - 15 enlisted men
- artillery section - 20 enlisted men
- provost marshal's section - 4 enlisted men

equipment for troop is
- 1 car, closed (QMC)
- 2 car, light (QMC)
- 1 car, touring (QMC)
- 3 motorcycles with sidecar (QMC)
- 3 motorcycles (QMC)
- 10 trucks, motor (QMC)
- 88 horses, riding
- 120 rifles
- 99 pistols
Very interesting information here. Would this organization, then, be strictly corps level for this TOE. I would take it that it would be.

Yet another surprising item. Perhaps there were a few more mounted US troops in WWI than we would have suspected?

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From the WWI list:
Just found this online: MANEUVER AND FIREPOWER: THE EVOLUTION OF DIVISIONS
AND SEPARATE BRIGADES by John B. Wilson, CENTER OF MILITARY HISTORY,
UNITED STATES ARMY, WASHINGTON, D. C., 1998

~~~~~ The pertinent section, regarding the formation and function of the
Headquarters Troop, follows below.. According to this, the Hdqtrs Troop was
used primarily as messengers within the division, and for work details. It
makes no mention of using them for security functions. It does say that
they were mounted. It describes them as cavalry, being the surviving
vestige of the original full regiment of cavalry which was a part of the
division in its earlier form.

~~~~~~~~

"By 10 May 1917, Majs. John McAuley Palmer, Dan T. Moore, and Brunt Wells of
the War College Division outlined a division of 17,700 men, which included
about 11,000 infantrymen in accordance with Scott's idea. In part it
resembled the French square division. Planners eliminated 1 infantry brigade
and cut the number of infantry regiments from 9 to 4, thereby reducing the
number of infantry battalions from 27 to 12. But regimental firepower
increased, with the rifle company swelling from 153 officers and enlisted
men to 204, and the number of regimental machine guns rising dramatically
from 4 to 36. To accommodate the additional machine guns, Palmer, Moore, and
Wells outlined a new infantry regimental structure that consisted of
headquarters and supply companies and three battalions. Each battalion had
one machine gun company and three rifle companies. Given the reduction in
the number of infantry units, the proportion of artillery fire support per
infantry regiment increased without altering the number of artillery
regiments or pieces. The new division still fielded forty-eight 3-inch guns,
now twelve pieces per infantry regiment. The division was also authorized a
regiment of twenty-four 6-inch howitzers for general support, and twelve
trench mortars of unspecified caliber completed the division's general fire
support weapons.

Cavalry suffered the largest cut, from a regiment to an element with the
division headquarters, a change in line with British and French
recommendations. The Allies argued that trench warfare, dominated by machine
guns and artillery weapons, denied cavalry the traditional missions of
reconnaissance, pursuit, and shock action. Mounted troops, possibly assigned
to the division's headquarters company, might serve as messengers within the
division but little more. The Allies further advised that the Army should
not consider sending a large cavalry force to France. Horses and fodder
would occupy precious shipping space, and the French and British had an
abundance of cavalry. Engineer, signal, and medical battalions and an air
squadron rounded out the divisions.

To conduct operations, the French advocated a functional divisional staff,
that would include a chief of staff and a chief of artillery as well as
intelligence, operations, and supply officers, along with French
interpreters. Although small, such a body would have sufficient resources to
allow the division to function as a tactical unit while a small headquarters
troop would furnish work details. Adjutants alone were to comprise the staff
of the infantry and artillery brigades, which had no headquarters troop for
work details. The next higher headquarters, the army corps, would provide
planning and administration for active operations."

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From the WWI Ukans list:
The divisional headquarters troop officially appeared for the first time (so far as I'm aware) in Tables of Organization, 1917, which were published on May 3d of that year. These were the detailed tables that gave effect to the broad provisions of the National Defense Act of June 3, 1916. They were equally binding on the Regular Army, the National Guard, and other prospective federal forces.

Section 2 of the act, which defined the compostion of the Regular Army, provided that the Army should include "the brigade, division, army corps, and army headquarters, with their detachments and troops." I believe that division headquarters troops were created under this clause, but I can't prove it.

Under these tables the headquarters of an infantry division and a cavalry division were identical and included a headquarters and a headquarters troop. The headquarters troop conisted of 1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 1 supply sergeant, 1 mess sergeant, 1 stable sergeant, 6 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 cooks, 2 horseshoers, 1 mechanic, 1 saddler, 2 buglers, 24 privates first class, and 43 privates. Transportation included 5 motor cars, 1 motor truck, 19 motorcycles, and 71 riding horses.

The last regulation on the subject before this (again, so far as I'm aware) was contained in Tables of Organization, 1914, which were published on February 25th. According to these, the headquarters of an infantry division at war strength was to include, in addition to the Hospital Corps detachment, 1 sergeant, 2 corporals, and 8 privates of infantry; and 2 sergeants, 4 corporals, and 16 privates of cavalry (all cavalrymen mounted); all combatant enlisted men were detailed from organizations in the division. They're listed on the table for division headquarters as "for guard, fatigue, etc." Apparently the idea of a special, and specially named, unit for this purpose at division headquarters was still developing.

These were theoretical organizations of course. I believe that shortages of mounts and tonnage prevented divisional headquarters troops from serving mounted when overseas. I've just now reviewed a pictorial history of the 26th Division and there's a photo of the divisional headquarters troop, 26th Division, in Château Thierry. They're on foot. These units were probably partially mounted, at best.

The divisional headquarters troop as organized on January 14, 1918, was nearly the same as it was on May 3, 1917. It was led by three mounted officers (a captain and two lieutenants) and contained 122 enlisted men. Transportation was much the same. Nothing hints that the function of the headquarters troop had changed.

Not all of the officers of divisional headquarters troops were Cavalry officers. A small number of National Guard cavalry units were assigned as divisional headquarters troops but most, it seems, were converted into machine gun units when the Guard was reorganized for service in the A.E.F. The sources of divisional headquarters troops for National Guard divisions, according to the 1918 report of the militia bureau, were:

26th Division: Troop B, Massachusetts Cavalry.

27th Division: 6th (New York) Division Headquarters Troop.

28th Division: 7th (Pennsylvania) Division Headquarters Troop, and Troop I, 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry.

29th Division: Detachment from New Jersey Cavalry.

30th Division: Troop A, South Carolina Cavalry.

31st Division: Troop A, Georgia Cavalry.

32d Division: 3d Wisconsin Infantry (2 men), 6th Wisconsin Infantry (3 officers and 102 men), 1st Michigan Cavalry (3 men).

33d Division: Individual transfers.

34th Division: Troop A, 1st Iowa Cavalry.

35th Division: Troop A, 1st Squadron Kansas Cavalry.

36th Division: Texas Division Headquarters Troop and Headquarters Troop, 1st Texas Cavalry.

37th Division: Ohio Division Headqarters Troop.

38th Division: Individual transfers.

39th Division: 2d Separate Troop, Louisiana Cavalry.

40th Division: Troop D, 1st California Cavalry.

41st Division: Troop C, 1st Separate Squadron, Washington Cavalry.

42d Division: 1st Separate Troop, Louisiana Cavalry.

So divisional headquarters troops were drawn from a variety of sources. Only the 27th, 28th, 36th, and 37th Divisions began the war the divisional headquarters troops in existence. The 26th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 34th, 35th, 39th, 40th, 41st, and 42d Divisions drew their headquarters troops from National Guard cavalry units. The 32d Division drew its headquarters troop from National Guard infantry units. Finally, the 33d and 38th Divisions had to resort to individual transfers.

I can definitely state that the Massachusetts cavalry unit was diverted from its original role. The squadron to which it belonged was one of three squadrons from southern New England that were intended to serve together as a composite divisional cavalry regiment, quite distinct in organization and function from the divisional headquarters troop.

I don't believe I've ever seen anything in print that describes the duties of the divisional headquarters troop. I can only surmise. However I think I'm on safe ground when I say that the difference in the duties of the headquarters troop and the military police was a difference of magnitude. The headquarters troop was responsible for preserving order in the area occupied by division headquarters, while the MPs were responsible for the area occupied by the division as a whole.
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From the WWI Ukans list


29th Division: Detachment from New Jersey Cavalry.
[/quote]

First Combat

The Troop received its baptism of fire during the Mexican Border Campaign. After serving for six months in this campaign, the Troopers had scarcely sheathed their sabers, when, on July 28, 1917, they were again called into federal service. The Troop then became Headquarters Troop and Companies A and B of the 104th Military Police of the 29th Division. Shortly after the Division arrived in France it was ordered into the Meuse-Argonne offensive, on September 29, 1918. On July 23, the 216th MP Company containing 35 of the original troopers was mustered out of service at Camp Dix, N. J.
[/quote]

On the Essex Troop, from:

http://www.virtualnewarknj.com/military ... roop03.htm

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88th HQ Troop roster:
# Name, Rank and Home Address

# Abbett, Earl F., Sergt., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Alton, Thomas, Corp., Bessie, N. D.

# Baker, James J., Cook, Pittsburgh, Pa.

# Batchelder, Byron H., Wag., Fargo, N. D.

# Benne, Calvin C., Wag., Upton, Wyo.

# Berry, Hubbard K., Sergt., West Jefferson, Ohio.

# Biegenzahn, Frank J., Pvt., Marmartle, N. D.

# Burke, Simpson S., Wag., Atlantic, Iowa.

# Burnell, Herbert A., Pvt., Wolf Point, Mont.

# Calicoat, Robert, Pvt., Huntington, W. Va.

# Campbell, John D., Corp., Patton, Cal.

# Carpenter, William I., 2nd Lt., Baxter, Mont.

# Casey, James C., Wag., Cedar Falls, Iowa.

# Chalmers, Samuel, Mess Sergt., Minakada Club, Minneapolis, Minn.

# Comegys. William M., Pvt., 719 Dixon St., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Conway, Elmer A., 1st Lt., N. E. Taylor St., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Court, Carl E., Pvt., 1st Cl., 1209 Main St., Cedar Falls, Iowa.

# Craite, Isaac J., Pvt., Rice Lake, Wis.

# Crockett, Charles C., Pvt., 1606 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind.

# Crose, Fred, Pvt., Scranton, Iowa.

# Curtiss, Clinton C., Pvt., 712 4th St. N. E., Little Falls, Minn.

# Davidson, Charles, Pvt., Wadena, Minn.

# Dobson, Richard B., Pvt., 1st Cl., R. F. D. No. 2, Burlington, Iowa.

# Donelson, Earl C., Wag., Lacon, Ill.

# Dotseth, John, Corp., Decorah, Iowa.

# Drummond, Floyd N., Corp., R. F. D. No. 7, Logansport, Ind.

# Dunston, Clarence C., Pvt., 426 3rd E. St., Hutchinson, Kan.

# Elder, William B., Pvt., R. F. D. No. 3, Emmilenton, Pa.

# Erickson, Carl A., Wag. 604 1/2 Emmerson St., Detroit, Mich.

# Finney, Paul J., Corp., Wiota, Iowa.

# Fleisher, Clark O., Pvt., Seagertown, Pa.

# Foster, Elmer, Pvt., Ortonville, Minn.

# Fowle, Charlie, Mech., R. F. D. No. 3, Fender, Neb.

# Franklin, Elsworth R., Wag., Douglas, N. D.

# Gilligan, John F., Pvt., Jefferson, Iowa.

# Gustafson, Clarence H., Pvt., Chenowith, N. D.

# Hallen, Oscar G., Pvt., 1st Cl., 3515 33rd Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Happe, Theodore W., Pvt., Carroll, Iowa.

# Harkins, Clinton G., Wag., Desart, N. D.

# Hartman, Elmer, Pvt., Amidon, N. D.

# Hartnagle, Chester M., Sergt., Chamberlain Hotel, Des Moines, Iowa.

# Haversack, W., Pvt., 1st Cl., 5301 39th Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Hedrick, Archie D., Wag., Hattisburg, Miss.

# Henry, John W., Pvt., 1st Cl., Perry, Iowa.

# Hilbert, Michael, Pvt., R. F. D. No. 1, Zenda, Kan.

# Hinegardner, Ferdinell E., Pvt., 534 N. Pearl St., Havana, III.

# Huss, Leo J., Hsr., Shakopee, Minn.

# Jackson, James C., Wag., R. F. D. No. 3, Batavia, Iowa.

# Jones, Hugh, Sergt., Dalzell, S. C.

# Julius, Ray F., Pvt., 1033 4th St.. Huron, S. D.

# Kelly, James R., Pvt., 1st. Cl., Amboy, Ill.

# Kisky, Eunes, Pvt., 1214 College Ave., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Knapp, Edward, Cook, Rockwell City, Iowa.

# Lee, Benjamin W., Pvt.. 512 Union St., Coffeyville, Kan.

# Lee, Vern M., Sergt., Mt. Cory, Ohio.

# Leuser, George A., Cook, 2110 E. 42nd St., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Lien, Raymond, Pvt., Valley City, N. D.

# Loudon, David B., Pvt., Thedford, Neb.

# Lower, Orville E., Sergt., Newton, Iowa.

# Lung, Frank Y., Pvt., 525 Locust St., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Maher, Michael, Pvt., 76 Park Place, St. Paul, Minn.

# Marshall, Don, Sup. Sergt., Wahkensa Park, Des Moines, Iowa.

# McDonald, D. J., Mess Sergt., 242 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis, Minn.

# McKay, Leslie J., Sergt., 501 N. 7th St., Grand Forks, N. D.

# McKee, Carl S., Corp., Virginia, Minn.

# Meinken, Arthur F., Pvt., 116 6th Ave., S. Oelwein, Iowa.

# Miller, Jack, Pvt., Mahnomen, Minn.

# Morden, Bert E., Wag., Jefferson, Iowa.

# Mousel, Joseph Wm., Pvt., Dell Rapids, S. D.

# Myers, Joseph C., Pvt., Aurora, Neb.

# Nielsen, Asmus, Wag., 1318 State St., Cedar Falls, Iowa.

# Nugent, Albert V., Pvt., Pineville, La.

# O'Connor, Walter T., Pvt., Carroll, Iowa.

# Overcash, Victor O., 2nd Lt. Kallispell, Mont.

# Pember, Alvah M., Pvt,, Dennan, Neb.

# Pennig, Alouious T., 1st Sergt., 814 Van Buren St., St. Paul, Minn.

# Peterson, Julius, Pvt., Flasher, N. D.

# Phelan, George H.. Bug., Burkley, Iowa.

# Quigley, John H., Capt., 645 Polk Blvd., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Robertson, Allen P. Pvt., 716 E. 5th St., Winfield, Kan.

# Sadler, Jack B., Pvt., 807 N. 4th St., Arkansas City, Kan.

# Sands, Louis H., Pvt., Robinson, Kan.

# Schipporeit, Edward 0., Wag., 503 N. 8th St., Albia, Iowa.

# Seidel, John, Pvt., R. F. D. No. 4, Scranton, Iowa.

# Shay, Raymond A., 2nd Lt., Iowa City, Iowa.

# Shearer, Claude N., Pvt., 1st Cl., Winterset, Iowa.

# Shreves, Harry M., Wag., Guthrie Center, Iowa.

# Sichting. Carl A., Pvt., Marmath, N. D.

# Siedenberg, William J., Pvt., Rapid City, S. D.

# Stivers, George L., Pvt., Washta, Iowa.

# Stockton, Geo. A., Cook, 3502 E. D St., Tacoma, Wash.

# Sturgeon, Rolla S., Pvt., R. F. D. No. 1, North Girard, Pa.

# Sturtevant, Glenn R., Pvt., 1505 Pleasant St., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Thue, Siguard H., Pvt., Walker, Minn.

# Timion, Lee E., Wag., 328 N. Main St., Cedar Falls, la.

# Tretter, Philip, Cook, Campus, Livingston, Ill.

# Tucker, William D., Pvt., Arbyrd, Mo.

# Vifquain, John S., Corp., Belle Plaine, Iowa,

# Virden, Stratton, Pvt., Norden, Minn.

# Wade, Ruford B., Sad., 1226 Standard Ave., Indianapolis, Ind.

# Walsh, Robert E., Pvt., 80 Como Ave., St. Paul, Minn.

# Webster, John L., Pvt., Amidon, N. D.

# Welch, Chester C., Pvt., 1st Cl., Rockwell City, Iowa.

# Wells, Fred E., Pvt., R. F. D. No. 1, Riverside, W. Va.

# Wheelock, Raymond C., Pvt., 1510 Woodland Ave., Des Moines, Ia.

# Wolfley, George W., Pvt., 906 Shawnee St., Hiawatha, Kan.

# Woods, Willie, Pvt., Clay, W. Va.

# Youel, Cecil R., Wag., Vinton, Iowa.

# Young, Alva G., Pvt., Austin, Minn.
Note the Saddler listed.

From:

http://www.distantcousin.com/Military/W ... Troop.html

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Originally posted by Pat Holscher
88th HQ Troop roster:
# Name, Rank and Home Address

# Abbett, Earl F., Sergt., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Alton, Thomas, Corp., Bessie, N. D.

# Baker, James J., Cook, Pittsburgh, Pa.

# Batchelder, Byron H., Wag., Fargo, N. D.

# Benne, Calvin C., Wag., Upton, Wyo.

# Berry, Hubbard K., Sergt., West Jefferson, Ohio.

# Biegenzahn, Frank J., Pvt., Marmartle, N. D.

# Burke, Simpson S., Wag., Atlantic, Iowa.

# Burnell, Herbert A., Pvt., Wolf Point, Mont.

# Calicoat, Robert, Pvt., Huntington, W. Va.

# Campbell, John D., Corp., Patton, Cal.

# Carpenter, William I., 2nd Lt., Baxter, Mont.

# Casey, James C., Wag., Cedar Falls, Iowa.

# Chalmers, Samuel, Mess Sergt., Minakada Club, Minneapolis, Minn.

# Comegys. William M., Pvt., 719 Dixon St., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Conway, Elmer A., 1st Lt., N. E. Taylor St., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Court, Carl E., Pvt., 1st Cl., 1209 Main St., Cedar Falls, Iowa.

# Craite, Isaac J., Pvt., Rice Lake, Wis.

# Crockett, Charles C., Pvt., 1606 E. Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind.

# Crose, Fred, Pvt., Scranton, Iowa.

# Curtiss, Clinton C., Pvt., 712 4th St. N. E., Little Falls, Minn.

# Davidson, Charles, Pvt., Wadena, Minn.

# Dobson, Richard B., Pvt., 1st Cl., R. F. D. No. 2, Burlington, Iowa.

# Donelson, Earl C., Wag., Lacon, Ill.

# Dotseth, John, Corp., Decorah, Iowa.

# Drummond, Floyd N., Corp., R. F. D. No. 7, Logansport, Ind.

# Dunston, Clarence C., Pvt., 426 3rd E. St., Hutchinson, Kan.

# Elder, William B., Pvt., R. F. D. No. 3, Emmilenton, Pa.

# Erickson, Carl A., Wag. 604 1/2 Emmerson St., Detroit, Mich.

# Finney, Paul J., Corp., Wiota, Iowa.

# Fleisher, Clark O., Pvt., Seagertown, Pa.

# Foster, Elmer, Pvt., Ortonville, Minn.

# Fowle, Charlie, Mech., R. F. D. No. 3, Fender, Neb.

# Franklin, Elsworth R., Wag., Douglas, N. D.

# Gilligan, John F., Pvt., Jefferson, Iowa.

# Gustafson, Clarence H., Pvt., Chenowith, N. D.

# Hallen, Oscar G., Pvt., 1st Cl., 3515 33rd Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Happe, Theodore W., Pvt., Carroll, Iowa.

# Harkins, Clinton G., Wag., Desart, N. D.

# Hartman, Elmer, Pvt., Amidon, N. D.

# Hartnagle, Chester M., Sergt., Chamberlain Hotel, Des Moines, Iowa.

# Haversack, W., Pvt., 1st Cl., 5301 39th Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Hedrick, Archie D., Wag., Hattisburg, Miss.

# Henry, John W., Pvt., 1st Cl., Perry, Iowa.

# Hilbert, Michael, Pvt., R. F. D. No. 1, Zenda, Kan.

# Hinegardner, Ferdinell E., Pvt., 534 N. Pearl St., Havana, III.

# Huss, Leo J., Hsr., Shakopee, Minn.

# Jackson, James C., Wag., R. F. D. No. 3, Batavia, Iowa.

# Jones, Hugh, Sergt., Dalzell, S. C.

# Julius, Ray F., Pvt., 1033 4th St.. Huron, S. D.

# Kelly, James R., Pvt., 1st. Cl., Amboy, Ill.

# Kisky, Eunes, Pvt., 1214 College Ave., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Knapp, Edward, Cook, Rockwell City, Iowa.

# Lee, Benjamin W., Pvt.. 512 Union St., Coffeyville, Kan.

# Lee, Vern M., Sergt., Mt. Cory, Ohio.

# Leuser, George A., Cook, 2110 E. 42nd St., Minneapolis, Minn.

# Lien, Raymond, Pvt., Valley City, N. D.

# Loudon, David B., Pvt., Thedford, Neb.

# Lower, Orville E., Sergt., Newton, Iowa.

# Lung, Frank Y., Pvt., 525 Locust St., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Maher, Michael, Pvt., 76 Park Place, St. Paul, Minn.

# Marshall, Don, Sup. Sergt., Wahkensa Park, Des Moines, Iowa.

# McDonald, D. J., Mess Sergt., 242 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis, Minn.

# McKay, Leslie J., Sergt., 501 N. 7th St., Grand Forks, N. D.

# McKee, Carl S., Corp., Virginia, Minn.

# Meinken, Arthur F., Pvt., 116 6th Ave., S. Oelwein, Iowa.

# Miller, Jack, Pvt., Mahnomen, Minn.

# Morden, Bert E., Wag., Jefferson, Iowa.

# Mousel, Joseph Wm., Pvt., Dell Rapids, S. D.

# Myers, Joseph C., Pvt., Aurora, Neb.

# Nielsen, Asmus, Wag., 1318 State St., Cedar Falls, Iowa.

# Nugent, Albert V., Pvt., Pineville, La.

# O'Connor, Walter T., Pvt., Carroll, Iowa.

# Overcash, Victor O., 2nd Lt. Kallispell, Mont.

# Pember, Alvah M., Pvt,, Dennan, Neb.

# Pennig, Alouious T., 1st Sergt., 814 Van Buren St., St. Paul, Minn.

# Peterson, Julius, Pvt., Flasher, N. D.

# Phelan, George H.. Bug., Burkley, Iowa.

# Quigley, John H., Capt., 645 Polk Blvd., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Robertson, Allen P. Pvt., 716 E. 5th St., Winfield, Kan.

# Sadler, Jack B., Pvt., 807 N. 4th St., Arkansas City, Kan.

# Sands, Louis H., Pvt., Robinson, Kan.

# Schipporeit, Edward 0., Wag., 503 N. 8th St., Albia, Iowa.

# Seidel, John, Pvt., R. F. D. No. 4, Scranton, Iowa.

# Shay, Raymond A., 2nd Lt., Iowa City, Iowa.

# Shearer, Claude N., Pvt., 1st Cl., Winterset, Iowa.

# Shreves, Harry M., Wag., Guthrie Center, Iowa.

# Sichting. Carl A., Pvt., Marmath, N. D.

# Siedenberg, William J., Pvt., Rapid City, S. D.

# Stivers, George L., Pvt., Washta, Iowa.

# Stockton, Geo. A., Cook, 3502 E. D St., Tacoma, Wash.

# Sturgeon, Rolla S., Pvt., R. F. D. No. 1, North Girard, Pa.

# Sturtevant, Glenn R., Pvt., 1505 Pleasant St., Des Moines, Iowa.

# Thue, Siguard H., Pvt., Walker, Minn.

# Timion, Lee E., Wag., 328 N. Main St., Cedar Falls, la.

# Tretter, Philip, Cook, Campus, Livingston, Ill.

# Tucker, William D., Pvt., Arbyrd, Mo.

# Vifquain, John S., Corp., Belle Plaine, Iowa,

# Virden, Stratton, Pvt., Norden, Minn.

# Wade, Ruford B., Sad., 1226 Standard Ave., Indianapolis, Ind.

# Walsh, Robert E., Pvt., 80 Como Ave., St. Paul, Minn.

# Webster, John L., Pvt., Amidon, N. D.

# Welch, Chester C., Pvt., 1st Cl., Rockwell City, Iowa.

# Wells, Fred E., Pvt., R. F. D. No. 1, Riverside, W. Va.

# Wheelock, Raymond C., Pvt., 1510 Woodland Ave., Des Moines, Ia.

# Wolfley, George W., Pvt., 906 Shawnee St., Hiawatha, Kan.

# Woods, Willie, Pvt., Clay, W. Va.

# Youel, Cecil R., Wag., Vinton, Iowa.

# Young, Alva G., Pvt., Austin, Minn.
Note the Saddler listed.

From:

http://www.distantcousin.com/Military/W ... Troop.html

Pat
Interesting how many of these guys were from prairie or Mid Western states. Kansas, Iowa, Minnesota, seem frequently mentioned.

Pat
B. Miers

My father, 2nd Cavalry, <b>Troop I</b>, Third Corps, was connected to Second Divison Headquarters as a messenger. He and his horse were close companions carrying messages through 5 major battles for which he has medals with the corresponding battle bars and the Fourragere awarded by the French. I have his notebook he carried with him listing the places travelled by horse or by train. I found a post which corresponds to the places cited in his notebook at: 2ndUSCav@groups.msn.com called 2nd Cavalry Regiment in WWI posted by deddygetty on Dec 29, 2004. It details the 2nd Cavalry horsemen. I have found it strange that Troop I is never mentioned in the discussions, but this post has a photo which I have which includes my father. I hope this is helpful.
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Pat Holscher
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Originally posted by B. Miers
My father, 2nd Cavalry, Troop I, Third Corps, was connected to Second Divison Headquarters as a messenger. He and his horse were close companions carrying messages through 5 major battles for which he has medals with the corresponding battle bars and the Fourragere awarded by the French. I have his notebook he carried with him listing the places travelled by horse or by train. I found a post which corresponds to the places cited in his notebook at: 2ndUSCav@groups.msn.com called 2nd Cavalry Regiment in WWI posted by deddygetty on Dec 29, 2004. It details the 2nd Cavalry horsemen. I have found it strange that Troop I is never mentioned in the discussions, but this post has a photo which I have which includes my father. I hope this is helpful.
Thanks! Deddygetty, can we post a link to that photo here?

Pat
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Jim Bewley
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As an aside, I was in Hq&Hq Troop, 7/17th Air Cav. While all the line Troops (A, B & C) were set up with gun, scout and lift sections, we had a flight section of five Huey's (ie. Horses). The rest of the Troop consisted of the "S" shops (1, 2, 3 & 4), personnal, supply and so on. We flew the ash & trash missions and filled in with the line Troops as needed. Most of the members of the Troop did not fly, but were in a support role.

Jim
Andy H

I have an inquiry about a soldier I am researching and it appears there maybe some more information out there.

I am particularly interested in PFC Harry R Stone who was in the HQ Company of the 41st Div. He was in the National Guard, as is referenced above, but what I am trying to do is trace his steps from landing in France to when he died on 10/12/1918. I am hoping to either determine where the HQ was located at this time or determine if there is some reference book which will help me dig into those details.

Thanks for any help.

Andy
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