Fort Riley Hunt

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Philip S
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Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:28 am

I have attached an old photo of the Fort Riley Hunt. Someone wrote March 30 as the date below the photo but it appears to actually read Nov. 28th, '0 in the photo. It is quite faded so I had to do a little computer magic to bring out details.
Note the officers with their wives riding in sidesaddles.
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Philip S
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Wed Nov 10, 2010 8:20 am

A postcard photo of a later hunt at Fort Riley:
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Wed Nov 10, 2010 6:36 pm

A somewhat irreverent cartoon of the Fort Riley hunt from the 1928 Cavalry School annual "The Rasp":
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Wed Nov 10, 2010 7:06 pm

HUNTING IN THE ARMY

"Though this soldiering's all very well in its place When it meddles with hunting it's just a disgrace"

Fox hunting as a sport has appealed to army men for ages. Galloping hoofs, the cry of hounds, and a keen fast burst, are a kin to the thrill and surge or a charge; there is esprit, romance, tradition and pageantry,--not found in any other Sport. Hunting brings many military principles into play, Surprise, mobility, drive, determination. Riding to hounds develops an eye for country and an ability to negotiate it rapidly.

"Rum 'uns to follow."

Hunting with horse and hound was not only a pioneer sport, but practically the only sport indulged in by our Army during the early days. This was especially true at Fort Riley. Post life was drab and monotonous; the only relaxation lay in sport with horse, gun and hound. Early Riley history records the hunting of coyote and jack rabbit with hounds. Indeed that gallant beau sabreur, General George A. Custer, is said to have taken a pack of hounds with him during his Indian campaigns. It is natural that hunting in the Army should start on the broad acres of the Riley reservation. The present day Cavalry School Hunt was founded in 1895 by Lieutenantst H. T. Allen and C. G. Treat (later distinguished general officers), and was known as the "Riley Hounds". Hunting has been kept up almost continuously since 1895.

In 1921 The Cavalry School Hunt was officially organized and recognized as a member of the National Steeplechase and Hunt Association.

All members of the Center are entitled to hunting privileges without expense.

Those who desire to qualify mounts as hunters under the rules of the National Steeplechase and Hunt Association may do so by fulfilling the requirements. The Master of Foxhounds, who is authorized to qualify hunters under these rules, should be consulted.

(p1-2, “The Cavalry School Hunt” 1947-48, booklet)



The Cavalry School Hunt continued under the same name when the Cavalry School passed out of existence after WWII and was replaced by the Ground General School. I do not know when it ceased to exist.
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Couvi
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Wed Nov 10, 2010 8:15 pm

Philip,

What are the different positions of the personnel of “The Hunt.” I see terms like ‘Master of the Hun,’ ‘Whippers In,’ etc.
Couvi

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Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:12 pm

HUNTING TERMS

"Hoick - Hoick - Gone away - a-w-a-y!"

1. HUNTING is the sport of chasing a wild animal or a represented wild animal with a pack of hounds. It is, purely and simply a sport for sportsmen, for the love of the game.
2. THE STAFF consists of the Master, the Honorary Secretary, the Honorary Huntsman, the Honorary Whippers-in, the Kennel Huntsmen and the Whippers-in.
3. THE FIELD consists of all those participating in the hunt who are not members of the hunt staff.
4. THE MASTER is the club official who leads the hunt, controls the field, and is responsible for the training of the hounds. His full title is "M a s t e r of Fox h 0 u n d s" (abbreviation "M.F.H.") .
5. THE MASTER OF THE FIELD is the member of the hunt staff designated by the M.F.H. to lead the field.
6. THE HONORARY WHIPPERS-IN are hunt officers who assist the master to control the pack at a hunt, and who also assist him in the field training of the pack.
7. THE KENNEL HUNTSMAN is the hunt employee who has charge of the kennels and who cares for and handles the hounds under the direction of the M.F.H.
8. THE WHIPPERS-IN are hunt employees who assist the kennel huntsman in the care and handling of the hounds.
9. THE PACK consists of the hounds considered collectively
in anyone kennel.
10."RIOT."-When the hounds run hare or rabbit.
11."STEARN."-Tail of a hound.
12. "PACK IN."-A term used by the master and the whippers-in to get the pack to assemble at a check, or to get them back on the line during a run.
13. "MEET."-A meeting of the members and guests of the hunt club for the purpose of riding to the hounds.
14."LINE."-The line of scent.
15. "STRIKE."-The point where the scent is first picked up by the pack.
16."FULL CRY."-When the whole pack gives tongue.
17. "GONE AWAY."-The call of the M.F.H. when the pack has found and is following a scent.
18. "DRAG."-Type of hunt wherein the pack follows an artificial trail left by a sack saturated with scent which has been dragged over the ground.
19."CHECK"-Hounds stopped.
20."HOLD HARD"-Warning to a rider to stop or slow down.
21. "KILL."-The climax of a hunt. The incentive for the pack to run. In a drag hunt the kill is represented by raw meat, which is carried to the last check and there thrown to the hounds. In a live hunt it is that stage of the chase in which the fox (or other wild animal) is caught.
22 "MASK."-Head of a fox.
23. "WARE !"-A cry of caution used by members of the hunt to warn each other to beware of something. For example : "Ware hounds!" "Ware hole !" "Ware wire!"

(p. 3-5 “The Cavalry School Hunt 1947-48" booklet)

I have never participated in, or even seen a Fox Hunt, so this is a fascinating new world to me. Hopefully some of our fox hunting friends can add their insights.
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Couvi
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Thu Nov 11, 2010 7:02 am

Interesting stuff.
Couvi

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Thu Nov 11, 2010 7:30 am

I have the privilege of fox hunting on some of the same land that George Washington's pack hunted. (How's that for name dropping?!) Pat, I don't know if you were inquiring as to the physical order of people in the hunt, but there is a definite formal structure. The Master of the Hunt is usually (if not always) the owner of the pack, and serves as the president of the club. The Master is in charge of hunting the hounds if there is not an honorary or paid huntsman. Generally, the hounds lead, followed by the huntsman and the whippers-in (or "whips"). The whips are sort of like out-riders - they ride on the flanks and behind the huntsman to keep the pack from wandering too far and getting too spread out. Following this group is the remainder of the staff, led by the Master. Behind them ride the rest of the field - the members at large. Within the field, senior members (those who have "won their colors" -wearing the scarlet, or "Pink" coats) ride to the front. Often, the field is broken down according to abilities. There may be fast and slow fields, and jumping and non-jumping fields. The "hilltoppers" is a term to describe the slowest field, or one that is only following the hunt, and may not be formally involved. Our Hunt often has a fair amount of folks hilltopping in vehicles. You see, there is a lot of formal tradition and conventions involved! Some Hunts stick to these formalities more than others. As Wilde said, "The unspeakable chasing the inedible"!
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Thu Nov 11, 2010 8:23 am

The ladies enjoyed the Cavalry School Hunt too. Attached is the front page inscription of a book ("The Millbeck Hounds," by Gordon Grand) given to an unknown friend:
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Thu Nov 11, 2010 8:52 am

Some excerpts from “The Cavalry School Hunt 1947-48" which suggest its distinctive characteristics:



COUNTRY

"Come. I'll show you a country."

Our hunting country comprises the reservation of approximately 22,000 acres of rolling, upland prairie, broken by numerous woods, draws and ravines, and includes portions of the valley of the Smoky Hill, Republican and Kansas Rivers. The country, except for pastures, is practically unfenced. Suitable panels replace wire at appropriate points so that hunting may be conducted on all parts of the reservation.
Our country is famous for its splendid turf and grand galloping; very few hunts in America can boast of better going without the risk of paved roads and barbed wire. The valley of the Kaw and its tributaries is apparently unsuitable for fox; coyotes constitute the live quarry of our hounds. However, due to military demonstrations, maneuvers and almost continuous firing, coyotes are becoming scarce

PACK

"Those feathery things, the hounds, in front."

The Cavalry School Hunt has always been known for the excellence of its pack. The pack is the result of a very carefully planned breeding program carried on in spite of many initial difficulties and obstacles. The present pack traces back to 1922, when Major General H. T. Allen, then commanding the American Forces in Germany, donated the American Army's Coblenz pack of French stag hounds to the hunt; these crossed with American hounds established initially a breed which was useful and predominant. The present breeding policy has developed a type of half bred. The pack consists of 10 couples of hounds and eight puppies at the present time.

"STAFF PLEASE"

17. In approaching a jump, be sure that members of the hunt staff are over first, then be careful to choose a time when the jump is not crowded. N ever follow another rider in trace over a jump. Often serious accidents occur from such thoughtless.

18. In riding over the reservation do not plunge into high grass at a fast gait. The grass may be a mask for a dangerous ditch or hole. In riding over a section of the reservation where field artillery firing has been conducted, keep on the alert for shell holes. In riding through the woods do not hold branches and let them swing back into the face of an oncoming rider, and do not ride so close to another rider that the branches he strikes will swing into your face. Swinging branches often cause painful injuries.

19. Do not attempt to ride over the rimrock at a gait faster than a walk. Horses should be put over the rimrock carefully in order to avoid injury to their fetlocks and hocks.

20. When hunting on wet or slippery days use care in going up and down slopes. Later in the season ice is often found in the canyons, and unless riders use extreme care serious accidents may occur.

21. If a rider should fall or call for assistance it is the obligation of a good sportsman to go to his aid.

22. Accidents, however trivial, should be promptly reported to the M.F.H.

23. Many miles of extra riding may be avoided by watching the leaders of the pack, following their turns, and by guiding on the M.F.H., who usually knows the line and looks for an opportunity to cut the corners.

24. Do not leave the kill until the hounds have been dismissed or the M.F.H. has indicated that it is permissible to go home ahead of the hounds.
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Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:49 am

Description of a hunt from the 1927 Cavalry School annual “The Rasp” (p115-6):
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THE CAVALRY SCHOOL HUNT CLUB

A HUNT

THE breeze from the south brings with it the breath of spring . The sunshine and freshness of a Kansas morning in March are ideal for hound, horse, and rider.

The early members of the field reach the tree line south of Morris Hill in time to see the red-coats with the pack crossing Redoubt on the way to the rendezvous.

Master and whips dismount. The field gathers. "Briny" and "Boz;" "Wazoo" on Scaramouche; Charley Wharton and France Waters; Tom Herren and Dewey; Wallie Falck and Ben Grimes; "Doc" Gardner and Colonel Fleming; Sol Lipman and Smith, and now a whole group with a number of fair ladies-but it's time to mount. The Master and pack are moving off. Which way? Nobody knows. Private Bud Black of the 9th Horse is somewhere between two and three miles away with a trail leading to him, but not even the "Red-Coats" know where.

Mouthy SPORT speaks but no one pays him any attention; WHET and HARDIN join in, but still we know that they have not picked up a scent. Suddenly with a deep-toned melodious cry, BUCK darts to the front and flank, nose down, tail up. The pack knows BUCK, he is right, they follow him; others pick up the trail-then with one great cry, they're off!

The pack settles down: LADY, JAMIE, JACQUELINE and ALVIN soon overtake BUCK. First one, then another, leads; the trail turns; JACQUELINE, cutting across, takes the lead; it turns again-this time EDDIE wins the turn and with joyful cry leaps down into the wooded canyon, across the trickling stream and up over the rim-rock on the other bank.

The field, too, settles down to a smooth gallop, the leaders boldly following the pack over ditch and rock, others holding back, watching and listening for the leaders of the pack, taking advantage of the turns, cutting across, often coming in ahead of the more daring riders. For no horse can follow directly behind a fast pack on a breast-high scent across the Riley canyons and expect to be in at the "kill."

Suddenly the pack disappears over a crest. The first riders up see Private Kerr, the 9th Cavalry "check man," calling the pack together at a water-hole among the rocks. The field closes in, dismounts, breathes the horses. It is the first "check." The trail broken for the check has been dropped again a hundred yards away. Five or ten minutes' breathing spell and we are off again.

Open country this time; no trouble for the field to keep up as the pack zigzags in and out of the shallow draws that drain the uplands. Up another rise, a wire fence! but it is panelled with a stout post and rail, sixty feet long, plenty of room for the now scattered field. Qualified hunters, green jumpers, hacks and even polo ponies leap the barrier in a stride, for horses as well as riders catch the spirit of the chase. Seldom indeed is there a refusal on a hunt, and equally seldom is there a spill at a panel.

A sharp turn. "Hold hard" from the Master. The pack has overrun the trail. Glad of an opportunity to breathe their horses, the field pulls up on a knoll. The hounds are circling a bottom, making a wide sweep back toward the trail they left. BEAUTY gives tongue. They've off again. The whip waves "on." Around another rocky crag and we pull up on the banks of a creek. Another check. The thirsty pack is already in the water. The horses, too, quench their thirst while we stretch our legs and enjoy a smoke. Big GEORGE and inquisitive BELL are nosing along the bank while the rest of the pack are content to roll. in the grass and wait until they are called.

We pick up the trail again in a nearby covert. This time it leads toward home. A few more jumps, another rocky canyon, a smooth grassy hill, then we top a rise just in time to see the "kill." Ten couple of hungry hounds are devouring the "fox" they have trailed so far.

The kennel men jog off with the pack as we turn our horses slowly toward the stables.
Last edited by Philip S on Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:52 am

Philip S wrote:I have attached an old photo of the Fort Riley Hunt. Someone wrote March 30 as the date below the photo but it appears to actually read Nov. 28th, '0 in the photo. It is quite faded so I had to do a little computer magic to bring out details.
Note the officers with their wives riding in sidesaddles.
What an interesting photograph. The women's riding attire reminds me of something out of a John Ford movie.
Pat

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Philip S
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Fri Nov 12, 2010 9:48 pm

Portrait of Col. John W. Wofford, MFH the Cavalry School Hunt:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/11960375@N04/2812719842/
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Sat Nov 13, 2010 10:40 am

"Jumps by the River". From an early edition of 'The Rasp', this photograph taken at Ft Riley in the teens is among my favorites.
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Sat Nov 13, 2010 5:55 pm

HORACE P. JONES, SCOUT AND INTERPRETER.
An interesting account of a true scout and frontiersman, and first Master of the Hounds at Fort Sill, OK.
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/chro ... 2p380.html
Couvi

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Philip S
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Sat Nov 13, 2010 7:02 pm

Couvi wrote:HORACE P. JONES, SCOUT AND INTERPRETER.
An interesting account of a true scout and frontiersman, and first Master of the Hounds at Fort Sill, OK.
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/chro ... 2p380.html
Thanks Couvi. This story brings up an interesting point. There is a fuzzy line between the informal hunts using dogs (Custer was famous for this) and the more formal hunts which evolved later. The later hunts had a distinctly English flavor. They often dispensed with the quarry animal entirely and just went through the motions of chasing a scent previously drug through the area. In the case of Fort Riley this had an educational purpose as it was found that many officers had never ridden off a road or path. The hunt thus was a good way of teaching agressive cross country riding. It, of course, was fun for all too.
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Sat Nov 13, 2010 7:28 pm

~ THE ARTILLERY HUNT ~
As far back as the days of the Indian Territory, before Oklahoma became a State, packs of hounds were kept and hunted on the Fort Sill Military Reservation and on the Indian lands in the vicinity of the Wichita Mountains. In those days the howl of the coyote kept many a soldier awake and hounds were used to run their kinsman of the prairie. Some of the old residents in the vicinity remember and relate interesting incidents connected with the different packs that were kept and hunted in those bygone days, and even individual hounds are remembered and lauded by these old-timers; while packs containing excellent hounds have been maintained at different places, and meets of combined packs staged at various times and places for many years.

Just exactly when the Artillery Hunt was founded is not known, but it was sometime prior to 1917, for on the Reservation at Fort Sill packs were maintained off and on-sometimes private-sometimes regimental-both officers and men deriving a great deal of pleasure from riding to hounds in this far-away Army station. At the beginning of the World War, two regimental packs were being maintained at Fort Sill, but as all energy at this station was then being devoted to methods of improvement of artillery fire, there was little time to devote to the pleasure of riding to hounds, and the packs, naturally deteriorated, so that at the end of the war only a few of the old hounds were left. Coyotes became less plentiful on the reservation, and while hunting was again taken up, it was not followed with the same interest as before the War.

("Hunting in the United States and Canada," A. Henry Higginson and Julian Ingersoll Chamberlain, Doubleday, 1928)


Picture of the Artillery School (Ft. Sill) Hunt Staff, 1927.
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Philip S
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Sat Nov 13, 2010 7:46 pm

The following service hunts have chapters in ("Hunting in the United States and Canada," A. Henry Higginson and Julian Ingersoll Chamberlain, Doubleday, 1928):

The Eleventh Cavalry Hunt, est. Fort Oglethorpe, GA in 1909
The Cavalry School Hunt, Ft. Riley, KS
The Coblenz Hunt est. in occupied Germany in 1920, hounds were given to the Cavalry School Hunt when the Americans left in 1923
The Artillery Hunt, Ft. Sill, OK
The Infantry School Hunt, Fort Benning, GA

surprisingly, the Ft. Leavenworth Hunt was not included.
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Sat Nov 13, 2010 8:16 pm

The Fort Leavenworth Hunt was started in 1926 and not recognized as a member club of the National Steeplechase and Hunt Association until 1931. Ironically, I believe, it is the sole surviving sevice hunt club.

("The Fort Leavenworth Hunt," Paul Davidson, Lt. Col. Cav., MFH, 1939)
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Sun Nov 14, 2010 11:19 am

Philip S wrote:~ THE ARTILLERY HUNT ~
As far back as the days of the Indian Territory, before Oklahoma became a State, packs of hounds were kept and hunted on the Fort Sill Military Reservation and on the Indian lands in the vicinity of the Wichita Mountains. In those days the howl of the coyote kept many a soldier awake and hounds were used to run their kinsman of the prairie. Some of the old residents in the vicinity remember and relate interesting incidents connected with the different packs that were kept and hunted in those bygone days, and even individual hounds are remembered and lauded by these old-timers; while packs containing excellent hounds have been maintained at different places, and meets of combined packs staged at various times and places for many years.

Just exactly when the Artillery Hunt was founded is not known, but it was sometime prior to 1917, for on the Reservation at Fort Sill packs were maintained off and on-sometimes private-sometimes regimental-both officers and men deriving a great deal of pleasure from riding to hounds in this far-away Army station. At the beginning of the World War, two regimental packs were being maintained at Fort Sill, but as all energy at this station was then being devoted to methods of improvement of artillery fire, there was little time to devote to the pleasure of riding to hounds, and the packs, naturally deteriorated, so that at the end of the war only a few of the old hounds were left. Coyotes became less plentiful on the reservation, and while hunting was again taken up, it was not followed with the same interest as before the War.

("Hunting in the United States and Canada," A. Henry Higginson and Julian Ingersoll Chamberlain, Doubleday, 1928)


Picture of the Artillery School (Ft. Sill) Hunt Staff, 1927.
Artillery School Hunt Staff 1927.JPG
The first set of living quarters encountered on entering Fort Sill at Key Gate (the main gate) is the quarters of the Master of the Hounds at the Polo Field.
Couvi

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