RHA and RFA Remounts

Post Reply
User avatar
John Ruf
Past Society Member
Past Society Member
Posts: 1031
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2003 2:00 pm
Last Name: Ruf
Location: Culpeper, Virginia

Society Member

Inactive Society Member

Donation 2nd

Gentlemen:

This thread has been in the general forum, but I thought it might be of interest in the UP formum.

Royal Horse Artillery Remounts 1899-1927

As per our discussions on artillery horse types, here are my sources on the RHA guidelines. The RHA favored hunter type horses with “a considerable amount of thoroughbred blood”, of 15.2 hands, and of 1200 to 1300 lbs. weight.1

<i>Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer in Scotland</i>

License Holder: John Ruf,
License Number: CO2W00006923,
Expiration: 06/28/2006

Image
Figure I. 1899 R.H.A. Lead Horse.2

Image
Figure II. 1910 R.H.A. Team Horse.
“Weight-carrying hunter type. Every horse in the gun team or not should be capable of taking its place there if necessary in an emergency. The same is required right through. For the Royal Horse Artillery a little more quality and pace required than for Field Artillery. Height at four years 15.2 to 15.3 hands, over four years 15.2.5 to 16 hands…bought in Ireland for L42 as a four year old 15.2 hands.”3

Image
Figure III. 1910 R.F.A. Leader.
"A bay gelding 15.3, thirteen years old. Can gallop and looks as if he ought to have spent his life as a hunter; short legs, deep through the heart and a good shoulder."3

Image
Figure IV. 1927 R.H.A. Team Horse.
“A well-bred ‘ride and drive’ horse, able to gallop in a gun team. Short in the back, deep through the heart, strong quarters to hold the gun in the breeching, plenty of bone and good and true action. Entails being able to move with cavalry. Height at four years, 15.1.5 to 15.2.5, over four 15.2 to 15.3 hands. Weight 1,200 to 1,300 lb.”4

Image
Figure V. 1927 R.F.A./R.E. Team Horse.
"This is the best type of light vanner, similar to R.H.A. but somewhat heavier; quality and pace are less important. Must be capapble of moving at a fast trot over rough broken ground pulling a great weight. Height as for R.H.A.”4


Bibliography:
1. Major George Tylden. “Horses and Saddlery.” J. A. Allen & Co., London, 1965.
2. Lt.Gen. Sir Edwin Alderson. “Pink and Scarlet, or Hunting as a School for Soldiering.”
Heinemann., 1899.
3. The Board of Agriculture and Fisheries. “Types of Horse Suitable for Army Remounts.” HMSO., 1912.
4. War Office. “Types of Horse Suitable for Army Remounts.” HMSO., 1927.

Regards,

John Ruf
Culpeper, Virginia

"God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses."
Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham 1852-1936


User avatar
John Ruf
Past Society Member
Past Society Member
Posts: 1031
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2003 2:00 pm
Last Name: Ruf
Location: Culpeper, Virginia

Society Member

Inactive Society Member

Donation 2nd

Gentlemen:

This also was in the general forum, but may prove of interest to UP participants.

I had occasion to spend the day in research at the Library of Congress. I took the opportunity to follow up on a previous thread, and spend a few minutes on the issue of standards for military horses.

Much of the material had already been showcased on this forum, especially in regard to the U.S. standards, but I came across something new to me in the British War Office 1906 Remount Manual.

This fascinating pocket guide for Remount officers covered the gamut on the subject, down to transportation guidelines, and standardized forms and contracts.

Of particular interest was the fact that in the post-Boer war era the British government had developed two sets of standards for military horses, one for peacetime, and one for the exigencies of expeditionary warfare.

Needless to say, the wartime standards were relaxed, both in terms of age and size of horse.

There was also a noteworthy section detailing conformation and health issues that would preclude purchase. It was to be provided to sellers in order that they would not waste time presenting unfit mounts.

I attach copies of the relevant passages.
Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

<i>Crown copyright material is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.</i>


Regards,

John Ruf
Culpeper, Virginia

"God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses."
Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham 1852-1936
User avatar
John Ruf
Past Society Member
Past Society Member
Posts: 1031
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2003 2:00 pm
Last Name: Ruf
Location: Culpeper, Virginia

Society Member

Inactive Society Member

Donation 2nd

Gentlemen:

I recently obtained these two Carte-de-visite photographs of RFA drivers.

The first is pre-war, and shows a mount very true to the RFA remount ideal.

The second is a war-time photo, and in my opinion, the mount strays from the ideal, and is a coarser horse, especially in the head.

Note the double bridle on the 1913 photo, and the bareback driver. Also note that the lead rope runs to a leather collar high on the neck.

Image

Image

Regards,

John Ruf
Culpeper, Virginia

"God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses."
Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham 1852-1936
User avatar
Pat Holscher
Website Admin
Posts: 26957
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2000 6:51 pm
Last Name: Holscher
Location: USA
Contact:

Society Member

Donor Palm Leaf

Bump.
Pat

Animadvertistine, ubicumque stes, fumum recta in faciem ferri?
Post Reply