DRIVER'S BOOT

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hbtoday98
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2009 7:59 am
Last Name: Baker
Location: NEW ZEALAND

DOES THIS DRIVER'S BOOT CAME IN A BIGGER SIZE AND LEFT AND RIGHT HAVE THIS ONE I HAVE TO COPY BUT LIKE MOST THINGS WW1, I HAVE IT IS SMALL SOME OF THE DRIVER'S APPEAR TO BE ON THE OFF SIDE HORSE AND THE BOOT IS NOT REVERSIBLE.
PHOTO NZMR FRED FOOTE THE CROSSING ?
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ReversiblePortsmouth
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:04 pm
Location: Australia

Fred,

This is a drivers legging not a boot. It is made for the off side leg of the driver. I do not know of any situation where it is required on the on side leg of the driver. The legging was used on the wheelers or pole horse for the driver who encountered the vehicle pole. In essence it stopped damage to the drivers leg from smashing into the pole. The bronze artillery drivers statue at the Melbourne shrine of remembrance shows the example of the artillery drivers legging clearly.

Gerard
ReversiblePortsmouth

"A horse, A horse, My kingdon for a horse," from Richard 111 by W Shakespeare 1592.
hbtoday98
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2009 7:59 am
Last Name: Baker
Location: NEW ZEALAND

ReversiblePortsmouth wrote:Fred,

This is a drivers legging not a boot. It is made for the off side leg of the driver. I do not know of any situation where it is required on the on side leg of the driver. The legging was used on the wheelers or pole horse for the driver who encountered the vehicle pole. In essence it stopped damage to the drivers leg from smashing into the pole. The bronze artillery drivers statue at the Melbourne shrine of remembrance shows the example of the artillery drivers legging clearly.

Gerard
GERARD
THE PHOTO "FRED'S CROSSING" THE DRIVERS ARE ON BOTH SIDES OF THE POLE! THIS IS SMALL PART OF A WW1 PHOTO OF NEW ZEALAND TROOPS IN IT THERE ARE A FEW TEAMS WITH SADDLES ON THE OFF SIDE.
HERE IS THE SITUATION WHERE IT IS REQUIRED.

I COULD GUESS THAT THE LONG MARCH COULD HAVE THE AFFECT OF BENDING THE HORSE ONE WAY AND SO THEY DROVE ON THE OTHER SIDE TO STOP THIS AS YOU WOULD IN A DRIVING TEAM TODAY. THE TROOPER WAS TRAINED TO MOUNT BOTH SIDES.

CHEERS MAL
ReversiblePortsmouth
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:04 pm
Location: Australia

Mal,
I'm hearing what you say and perhaps my eye sight is inadequate but I can't see anyone mounted on the offside. Is there more of the photograph that depicts this? I'm not syaing you're wrong but it was not normal practice to control teams from the offside. Granted that you are referring to the saddles on the off side...well, you can't assume that because there is a saddle mounted on the off side horses that a rider was put in the seat. Yes drivers and troopers were/are still trained to mount both sides see RHA for example.

However it was common practice on the march to carry spare equipment, saddlery, packsaddlery and other items on the off side horse. I assume the photo depicts preparation prior to a deployment/march? Note that the role of the luggage saddle was to carry additional equipment for the driver etc on the off side.

I also have evidence from the Australian War Memorial of the uses of UP's for carrying kit in lieu of packsaddlery. A common use for UPs was carrying 18lber bombs on led horses. I've also seen situations where packsaddlery covered in tarps on off side horses in teams.

Gerard
Gerard
ReversiblePortsmouth

"A horse, A horse, My kingdon for a horse," from Richard 111 by W Shakespeare 1592.
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