A picture to help anyone who can use it

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walsh661
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This is a picture from 1915-16 of the CO of the 46th South Saskatchewan Battalion CEF
For reference if anyone needs it.
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Lt. Col Snell 46th South Saskatchewan CEF 1916
Lt. Col Snell 46th South Saskatchewan CEF 1916
Officer Mounted.jpg (91.77 KiB) Viewed 1835 times


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Pat Holscher
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walsh661 wrote:This is a picture from 1915-16 of the CO of the 46th South Saskatchewan Battalion CEF
For reference if anyone needs it.
Thanks for the photo. I take it this photo was taken when the unit was still in Canada? Or had it gone overseas by that time?

Also, I'm somewhat surprised by how far forward the riders legs appear to be. Or perhaps it's that the saddle is positioning him rather far back on the horse's back. It looks a little odd.

What saddle is this. A yeomanry or colonial pattern? It does not appear to be a UP.
Pat

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John Tremelling
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It does appear a Colonial Yeomanry saddle Pat. I would say that the rider is possibly adjusting his seat as he does seem to be short in the stirrup and far back. If you examine the stirrup leather it is going straight up his shin, almost as if he has raised his leg and it has fouled on his inner leg or top of his stolweiser. Other wise it is hanging almost from the pommel?

Forgive my spelling of stolweiser, I am sure that it is incorrect but for the life of me I am unable to find it in the dictionary.
John T

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walsh661
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We had the saddle up until the 70s where it was lost in a barn fire along with a number of UPs and other bridles and harness. I believe if memory of the description of the photo is correct, that this was taken in England after a session of jumping. His stirrup length and position of seat and leg would be as seen above due to him relaxing from a two point forward seat position back to a relaxed seat position further to the cantle and visiting after preparing to cool out his mount. It does look as if the stirrup leather is caught up on his leg causing an awkward look.
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