Attention:John Morgan- early 3rd patt drivers saddle

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ReversiblePortsmouth
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Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:04 pm
Location: Australia

Hello John Morgan,

I have recently acquired some 30 or so photocopied pages from a 1900 Artificers manual. The only reference I currently have is "1900 Artificers manual" written by hand on the front page. My pages start at around page 127 and finish at 205. The manual was for collar makers, coach makers and saddle tree repairs and what I have describes collars, harness, packsaddlery, luggage saddlery and numerous other things. There are some pages missing which is frustrating. There is an ink pad stamp of 61st Field Battery, Royal artillery stamped on one of the pages.

4 UP saddles and 3 drivers and 3 luggage saddles are described.

The number 3 drivers saddle, or more correctly the third pattern, interests me most because there is a description and an accompanying woodcut of the tree and seating arrangement. This saddle is almost identifical to the "Australian colonial artillery drivers saddle" that I have described on this thread.

The only difference with my saddle compared to the number 3 description is the girth points arrangement. ie the staple for the girth strap like on the patt 1890 and luggage saddles which you highlighted previously. This is evident in the woodcut picture yet my saddle has 3 girth straps screwed directly into the timber side boards. There is no evidence there was ever a staple attached. Otherwise my example has all the similarities of the number 3 drivers saddle description. Even the mortises for the stirrup leathers are shown.

Interestingly this third pattern is similar to the second pattern UP also described. The only different with the third pattern drivers saddle and the second pattern UP is that there is the steel staple under the rear arch for the flank trace strap on the third pattern drivers saddle.

Therefore I can now assume that the saddle I have was possibly based on or copied directly from the British third pattern, yet made in Australia prior to federation. This appears to be prior to or around the use of the patt 1890 and before we adopted the UP 02 and 12 universal patterns. It also demonstrates how closely we followed and kept abreast of the British system of saddlery. This I find amazing considering the methods of communication in that era and the distance between Australia and Britain.

Another interesting aspect is the fact my example has survived because I understand these patterns where to be used up, cannibalised, destroyed and basically not replaced when they wore out and couldn't be fixed anymore. So I suppose you could assume they gradually died out and that could be why there are not a lot of examples around.

The manual also provides hints at the logical progression and advancement for the UP's, drivers and luggage saddles, from wooden arches to flat steel to angled steel arches with many synergies between the drivers and luggage saddles that are captured.

I would like to try and obtain a full copy of this manual if possible. Do you have a copy of this manual in your collection I maybe able to obtain a copy from?

kind regards

Gerard Hogan


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"A horse, A horse, My kingdon for a horse," from Richard 111 by W Shakespeare 1592.
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John M
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Gerard,
Sorry not to have responded. Have you found what you seek?.
Otherwise, see if the 1899 manual, referred to in the intro to the site for downloading, will provide the info you need.
If not, I have copies of several of the Artificers manuals including the 1899 one which is the one you have parts of. I was puzzled by the page numbers you gave which did not seem to relate to mine,
John.
John D Morgan
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Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:04 pm
Location: Australia

Hi John,

The 1899 version doesn't contain nor refer to the information I'm seeking. I also am puzzled to the page numbers. The version I have has a lack of information. The title is handwritten and called artificers manual 1900 so this could be incorrect.

Do you have a 1900 artificer version? or at least perhaps, anything remotely related to the 4 patterns of UP's I have described?

regards

Gerard
ReversiblePortsmouth

"A horse, A horse, My kingdon for a horse," from Richard 111 by W Shakespeare 1592.
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