Search found 671 matches

by JV Puleo
Mon Aug 23, 2004 10:04 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: American Revolution redux
Replies: 89
Views: 20868

American Revolution redux

Gentlemen, In reference to the possible relationship between the American and French Revolutions, I am reminded of a piece of scholarship I recently read of. It appears that a French scholar has utilized French army records to locate the homes of most of them men who made up Rochambeau's force. Ther...
by JV Puleo
Tue Jul 20, 2004 5:19 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution
Replies: 63
Views: 18779

Wow! I read the material on the link above. I Have never even heard abut RI as the colonial horse breeding center. If the information is accurate, and I can't see why it wouldn't be, it answers all my questions . . . even that of why the horse supply problem elicits so few comments. People don't gen...
by JV Puleo
Tue Jul 20, 2004 4:29 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution
Replies: 63
Views: 18779

Gentlemen, You can see why I find the question so interesting. Especially because so little seems to be said about it in the few published sources we have. I'm hoping that there are some answers in materials that, so far, haven't been published as I have always accepted the idea that there was a sho...
by JV Puleo
Tue Jul 20, 2004 7:40 am
Forum: Archive
Topic: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution
Replies: 63
Views: 18779

Very interesting gentlemen. Its easy to learn something new every day here. By the middle of the 18th century Newport had already acquired a name for itself as a summer retreat for the wealthy. Many they came from New York but there was also an annual influx from the south. There was also a consider...
by JV Puleo
Mon Jul 19, 2004 11:28 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution
Replies: 63
Views: 18779

Pat, This is from the journal of Baron vonClosen. vonClosen was an officer of the Royal Deux Ponts and an aid to Rochambeau, partly because of family connections but also because he could speak English: "As for the horses, those I have seen up to now seem to be rather good, but not extraordinar...
by JV Puleo
Mon Jul 19, 2004 11:00 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution
Replies: 63
Views: 18779

SE Good point. I'd forgotten all about that but early in the twentieth century there were two well know race tracks. Narragansett and Lincoln. I would generally have associated the pacers with the 19th century "society" that made Newport its summer home but perhaps there is an older tradit...
by JV Puleo
Mon Jul 19, 2004 9:33 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution
Replies: 63
Views: 18779

Gentlemen, When Rocanmbeau's army landed at Newport, Rhode Island they brought no horses with them because the French navy had been completely unable to provide the necessary transport. In fact, about a third of the troops committed to the expedition had to be left behind. The one horse unit include...
by JV Puleo
Fri Jul 16, 2004 9:57 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution
Replies: 63
Views: 18779

Re: Cavalry Action in the American Revolution

Regarding the New England landscape: I live in northern Rhode Island, in a house indeterminate age that was standing in at least 1750. Now the area is heavily forested but all of the land, forested or not, is crisscrossed with stone walls that once separated fields. The land is far to stony to be ef...
by JV Puleo
Mon Jul 12, 2004 5:27 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: An unusual look at mounted WWII troops, Syria
Replies: 30
Views: 12835

An unusual look at mounted WWII troops, Syria

Pat, The only production run to equal it is the Model T Ford. Oddly enough Model T's were one of the favorite vehicles to use as "tenders" for the armored cars. The cars themselves were manned by navy personnel wearing army uniforms with navy insignia. It was the Royal Navy Armored Car Ser...
by JV Puleo
Mon Jul 12, 2004 4:28 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: An unusual look at mounted WWII troops, Syria
Replies: 30
Views: 12835

An unusual look at mounted WWII troops, Syria

Pat, They were even older than you think. Most of the armored cars and tenders built during the war were made out of used cars . . . either donated to the service or confiscated by the govternment. I believe that all of them were Silver Ghosts, a design that was introduced in 1908 and continued in p...
by JV Puleo
Mon Jul 12, 2004 1:15 am
Forum: Archive
Topic: An unusual look at mounted WWII troops, Syria
Replies: 30
Views: 12835

An unusual look at mounted WWII troops, Syria

There is an obscure book about this campaign. I believe the title is "The Golden Carpet" by Sommerset deChar. The column, which I think was called "Haberforce", was made up of guardsmen, some yeomanry cavalry and native troops from the Arab Legion commanded by John Bagott Glubb. ...