Search found 671 matches

by JV Puleo
Sun Aug 11, 2013 9:35 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Large collection of German WWI Photographs
Replies: 3
Views: 1110

Re: Large collection of German WWI Photographs

Huge. Oddly enough, another other country where it was extremely popular appears to be Bulgaria. I'm basing this on the surviving proportion WWI photographs (although most that I'm thinking of are non-government produced)... I've seen a lot more German examples than either French or British.
by JV Puleo
Sun Aug 11, 2013 9:30 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: 1847 CAVALRY MUSKETOON & CW Spencer
Replies: 7
Views: 2016

Re: 1847 CAVALRY MUSKETOON & CW Spencer

The article on the musketoon notes that the ball would pound out and unseat due to the jarring it'd take in the saddle. Is that correct? I'd never thought of that, but given that it is a smoothbore there isn't a great deal to hold it in there. Perhaps... and I don't doubt that someone made this com...
by JV Puleo
Thu Aug 08, 2013 10:48 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Large collection of German WWI Photographs
Replies: 3
Views: 1110

Re: Large collection of German WWI Photographs

I'm curious why he thinks "most photos are from the allies"... I have see a lot more German photos than anything else. I think every third German soldier had a Brownie box camera. My guess is that his exposure to the subject is limited to what he can find in a quick google search... in Eng...
by JV Puleo
Tue Aug 06, 2013 9:58 am
Forum: Archive
Topic: 1847 CAVALRY MUSKETOON & CW Spencer
Replies: 7
Views: 2016

Re: 1847 CAVALRY MUSKETOON & CW Spencer

The one page article on the musketoon appears to repeat the myth that it originated with "conservative ordnance officers" etc... In fact, the situation is exactly the opposite and the musketoon was a direct result of demands from the field by officers who didn't want breech loaders. When t...
by JV Puleo
Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:15 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Six Hundred First Class Chariots
Replies: 4
Views: 1272

Re: Six Hundred First Class Chariots

The translation directly from Hebrew reads: "He ordered his chariot and took his men with him; he took 600 of his picket chariots, and the rest of the chariots of Egypt, with officers in all of them." So... it sounds as if Pharaoh personally led the army, with 600 chariots of his personal ...
by JV Puleo
Wed Jul 24, 2013 3:31 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Six Hundred First Class Chariots
Replies: 4
Views: 1272

Re: Six Hundred First Class Chariots

As far as I know, there is exactly 1 extant Egyptian chariot and it was found, disassembled, in Tutankhamun's tomb. You would have to find someone learned in ancient semitic languages to look at the Hebrew version and then compare it to the Greek of the septuagent (the Greek translation of the Hebre...
by JV Puleo
Tue May 28, 2013 3:14 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: People confused by British unit names, apparently.
Replies: 10
Views: 3318

Re: People confused by British unit names, apparently.

Sgt. Ewart supposedly took the eagle of the 45th... so there were two eagles captured at Waterloo.

jp
by JV Puleo
Sun May 19, 2013 11:30 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: People confused by British unit names, apparently.
Replies: 10
Views: 3318

Re: People confused by British unit names, apparently.

Actually, a spell-checker wouldn't have caught that, which is precisely the problem. They almost certainly did use it... but just didn't bother to have anyone literate actually read it....what am I thinking. Its "People"... it anyone there literate?
by JV Puleo
Fri Apr 12, 2013 9:15 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: A question regarding British military pistol issuance
Replies: 32
Views: 9298

Re: A question regarding British military pistol issuance

Huge numbers of service records are available from the British National Archives... google "National Archives UK" Generally, I find the UK archives to be much more "user friendly" than the American archives... I'd start with a search on the name and location as its likely he came...
by JV Puleo
Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:26 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: A question regarding British military pistol issuance
Replies: 32
Views: 9298

Re: A question regarding British military pistol issuance

I would say yes. The other large customers seem to mining companies and governments in Latin America including quite a large number of Mexicans. But, a lot of countries and individuals bought M1911s during WWI and nearly all of them that weren't made for the US government had "C" prefixes ...
by JV Puleo
Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:07 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: A question regarding British military pistol issuance
Replies: 32
Views: 9298

Re: A question regarding British military pistol issuance

Actually, Colt shipped a large number of 1911's in .455 with "C" serial numbers to the Army & Navy Store in London. I've always thought that would be an interesting collecting area... most people presume "civilian" when they see the C numbers but the overwhelming majority of ...
by JV Puleo
Fri Mar 29, 2013 7:41 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: M1873 questions
Replies: 18
Views: 4059

Re: M1873 questions

I'm not certain when small arms came to be issued to officers. In the 1870s an officer could indent for a revolver, rifle or carbine and he would be charged for it. It then became his personal property. Presumably they could have borrowed one but if lost they would have been just a liable as an enli...
by JV Puleo
Thu Mar 28, 2013 3:27 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: M1873 questions
Replies: 18
Views: 4059

Re: M1873 questions

Good question. None comes to mind, but we should remember that most countries did not issue revolvers to private soldiers. I'm not even certain that the Russians issued the S&W to privates. With that in mind, the actual demand for handguns was largely restricted to officers who, in virtually eve...
by JV Puleo
Thu Mar 28, 2013 8:17 am
Forum: Archive
Topic: M1873 questions
Replies: 18
Views: 4059

Re: M1873 questions

I don't know how important ugly is. There were and are lots of really ugly guns that are also popular. But, the Starr DA ceased production during the war. Even though it had its problems, its seems the decision was made on cost as it was succeeded by a SA version. Actually, more of the SA revolvers ...
by JV Puleo
Wed Mar 27, 2013 2:14 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: M1873 questions
Replies: 18
Views: 4059

Re: M1873 questions

In addition to the Beaumont-Adams there was the Starr... an American double action revolver widely used in the CW... I think it might be 3rd behind the Colt 1860 and the Remington NM Army. So... it can't be said that the army was unaware of DA handguns. The Starr suffered from jamming problems and w...
by JV Puleo
Fri Mar 01, 2013 3:54 pm
Forum: Reviews & Commentary
Topic: The Birmingham System of Gun Manufacture
Replies: 6
Views: 2922

Re: The Birmingham System of Gun Manufacture

For a genuinely scholarly description of this subject, see "The Birmingham Gun Trade" by David Williams. And, in the interest of full disclosure, David and I spent today in the storage area of the Birmingham Science and Art Museum looking over the stuff that isn't on display. We saw some v...
by JV Puleo
Fri Mar 01, 2013 3:45 pm
Forum: Archive
Topic: Colt 1860s in Confederate service
Replies: 5
Views: 1880

Re: Colt 1860s in Confederate service

That's an 1851 Navy. As far as I know, there were no Confederate-made 1860 Armys.
by JV Puleo
Wed Feb 27, 2013 5:20 am
Forum: Archive
Topic: Colt 1860s in Confederate service
Replies: 5
Views: 1880

Re: Colt 1860s in Confederate service

Pat, Charlie Pate did an exhaustive article on the early M1860s in Man at Arms, V30 #4. I believe he address that issue as well. In a nutshell, Colt did not knowingly ship to States that had seceded, but not all of them joined the Confederacy at the same time and he had little control over what agen...
by JV Puleo
Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:50 am
Forum: Archive
Topic: Off Topic: Huzza!
Replies: 4
Views: 1176

Re: Off Topic: Huzza!

No... I should have been more precise. The first a is short and the second is long... Ha-ray As to the story about the Dragoons... I'm certain that is an old wives tale. The exclamation goes much further back than the 1830s... for all we know, it may be medieval. We might also be making a meaningles...
by JV Puleo
Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:46 am
Forum: Archive
Topic: Off Topic: Huzza!
Replies: 4
Views: 1176

Re: Off Topic: Huzza!

I seem to remember that, in my part of New England, it was pronounced "Harray" with a short a. This would be identical to the 18th century version.
The Russian version, going back to at least the 18th century was "Oorah."