Ascot 2013

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selewis
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Thu Jun 20, 2013 11:30 am

Congratulations to the Queen whose horse Estimate won the gold cup at Ascot about an our ago. The meet has been broadcast all week here in the US and it has been neat to see large fields, as many as 30 horses, running on grass and undulating terrain, clockwise, anti-clockwise, and sometimes both directions in the same race, also long (er) races (19 f). Another feature that was nice to see was horses ridden by their jockeys, with no pony horse, to the starting post.
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Jim Bewley
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Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:40 pm

selewis wrote:Congratulations to the Queen whose horse Estimate won the gold cup at Ascot about an our ago. The meet has been broadcast all week here in the US and it has been neat to see large fields, as many as 30 horses, running on grass and undulating terrain, clockwise, anti-clockwise, and sometimes both directions in the same race, also long (er) races (19 f). Another feature that was nice to see was horses ridden by their jockeys, with no pony horse, to the starting post.
And, almost everyone, hunts in a double bridle. Entirely different horse world over there, which I admire, but I guess they have been at it way longer then we have.

Jim
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unclearthur
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Sat Jun 22, 2013 11:15 am

Not round here they don't - it's gags and pelhams :wink:
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Jim Bewley
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Sat Jun 22, 2013 12:02 pm

Not sure where you are, but there are a lot of pictures in Horse & Hound, that indicates a number of folks, including juniors, do. In the U.S. of A, it is believed you have to be a very upper level rider, before you can even try one.

Jim
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Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:48 pm

Jim:

Two points regarding double bridles:

1) One doesn't especially need to be "advanced," but one really should have a good seat and hands as all that hardware is more prone to hurtful mischief than a simpler set of headgear;
2) Here in the USA they are generally used for the wrong reason anyway -- to artificially "set" a head in a way that would better be accomplished through good muscle development and better horsemanship (the related bascule and raising of the base of the neck).
Joe
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Jim Bewley
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Thu Jun 27, 2013 4:07 am

I agree completely Joe.


Jim
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unclearthur
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Fri Jun 28, 2013 1:07 pm

Jim Bewley wrote:Not sure where you are, but there are a lot of pictures in Horse & Hound, that indicates a number of folks, including juniors, do. In the U.S. of A, it is believed you have to be a very upper level rider, before you can even try one.

Jim

South Wales. We jokingly call it 'cowboy' country based on UK slang use of the word (ie. unprofessional)

You have to bear in mind H&H advise hunts in advance when their photographer will be visiting, so everyone has time to polish up their Sunday best tack :)
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Pat Holscher
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Sat Jun 29, 2013 7:21 am

Joseph Sullivan wrote:Jim:

Two points regarding double bridles:

1) One doesn't especially need to be "advanced," but one really should have a good seat and hands as all that hardware is more prone to hurtful mischief than a simpler set of headgear;
2) Here in the USA they are generally used for the wrong reason anyway -- to artificially "set" a head in a way that would better be accomplished through good muscle development and better horsemanship (the related bascule and raising of the base of the neck).
I've often wished that somebody who knew how to use the double bridle correctly could teach me how to do it. It's not that I need to know, it's just that I'd like to know how to.
Pat

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Pat Holscher
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Sat Jun 29, 2013 7:25 am

unclearthur wrote:
Jim Bewley wrote:Not sure where you are, but there are a lot of pictures in Horse & Hound, that indicates a number of folks, including juniors, do. In the U.S. of A, it is believed you have to be a very upper level rider, before you can even try one.

Jim

South Wales. We jokingly call it 'cowboy' country based on UK slang use of the word (ie. unprofessional)

You have to bear in mind H&H advise hunts in advance when their photographer will be visiting, so everyone has time to polish up their Sunday best tack :)
Here in actual cowboy country we often find the use of that term really baffling, when used in this way. I really attribute it to the movies, and earlier fiction, which gave rise to the wild cowboy image. Actual working cowboys tend to be pretty knowledgeable on horses and the slang use of somebody being a "cowboy", IE., unprofessional or cavalier, doesn't really apply to them. For the same reason, I really dislike the popular phrase here in the States of "Cowboy Up." Cowboy Up? What's that mean? Long hours with low pay. . . ? Oh well. (Not indicating insult by the way, just noting the phrases).

For that matter, I wonder if the term "cavalier" really applied to cavaliers?
Pat

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Jim Bewley
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Sat Jun 29, 2013 4:36 pm

Pat Holscher wrote:Here in actual cowboy country we often find the use of that term really baffling, when used in this way. I really attribute it to the movies, and earlier fiction, which gave rise to the wild cowboy image. Actual working cowboys tend to be pretty knowledgeable on horses and the slang use of somebody being a "cowboy", IE., unprofessional or cavalier, doesn't really apply to them. For the same reason, I really dislike the popular phrase here in the States of "Cowboy Up." Cowboy Up? What's that mean? Long hours with low pay. . . ? Oh well. (Not indicating insult by the way, just noting the phrases).

For that matter, I wonder if the term "cavalier" really applied to cavaliers?
You are right Pat. Working cowboys can ride. If you watch cutting or team roping for instance, you see many dressage movements used very clearly.

Now, I have to say that "western pleasure" classes baffle me. I have never seen a working cowboy riding around with his horse's nose dragging in the dirt.

Jim
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Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:24 am

peanut rollers!
selewis
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Thu Jul 18, 2013 10:30 am

Pat Holscher wrote: For the same reason, I really dislike the popular phrase here in the States of "Cowboy Up." Cowboy Up? What's that mean? Long hours with low pay. . . ? Oh well. (Not indicating insult by the way, just noting the phrases).
It's interesting what a difference a few miles can make in the meaning of a phrase; that is, if I have my understanding of "cowboy up" correct, as I have heard it used in Utah. By context I always inferred that it meant to bear up bravely in the face of adversity, keep a goin': a complimentary reference.

Sandy
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Jim Bewley
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Thu Jul 18, 2013 3:06 pm

That is the way I have heard it used too Sandy. If it is hard, not fun and you don't like something, "cowboy up" meant to buckle down and just get on with it. I always related it to, "riding drag is not fun, but has to be done".

Jim
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