Civil War Rubber Saddle Blankets?

A forum for general topics and questions.
Post Reply
User avatar
Todd
Website Admin
Posts: 2458
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2000 4:10 pm
Medals: 2
Last Name: Holmes
Location: USA
:
Society Member Donation - Origin

Thu May 10, 2018 3:14 pm

:wtf:

In 'Ordnance memoranda. no.1 1863', under the section titled, "Returns of Ordnance Stores, Class VIII, Accoutrements And Appendages For Small Arms, And Horse Equipments For Artillery And Cavalry", we find interesting things - items recognized to be 'in the system', and to be accounted for under 'Class VIII' Ordnance items.
1863OrdnanceMemoranda_horseequipmentsforartillery and cavalry class.PNG
1863OrdnanceMemoranda_horseequipmentsforartillery and cavalry class.PNG (123.57 KiB) Viewed 146 times
selewis
Society Member
Posts: 2160
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2003 1:47 pm
Medals: 2
Last Name: Lewis
Location: USA
:
Society Member Donation - 3rd

Fri May 11, 2018 7:14 am

Wow. And horse covers too. On the face of it this seems so unworkable and manifestly harmful that I have to wonder about the definition of rubber in 1863 compared to what it evokes today.
User avatar
Todd
Website Admin
Posts: 2458
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2000 4:10 pm
Medals: 2
Last Name: Holmes
Location: USA
:
Society Member Donation - Origin

Fri May 11, 2018 7:25 am

selewis
Society Member
Posts: 2160
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2003 1:47 pm
Medals: 2
Last Name: Lewis
Location: USA
:
Society Member Donation - 3rd

Fri May 11, 2018 11:04 am

Thanks for that Todd,

I'm not surprised that rubber was tried or tested by the army, only that it seems, by your first post, to have been become an accepted article of issuance. Interesting to note (in the second article about half way down) that as early as the following year, 1864, one E.L. Perry had already been issued a patent for "…an improvement over ordinary India-rubber or Gutta-percha blankets." that was "self ventilating". I wonder what these rubber blankets were actually like, that is, a veneer over fabric like a slicker? or what exactly? It's seems improbable that any examples would have survived the trash bin once they wore out, but maybe… a new quest?
User avatar
wkambic
Society Member
Posts: 1514
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2000 6:44 pm
Medals: 1
Last Name: Kambic
Location: Kingston, TN
:
Society Member

Sat May 12, 2018 8:14 am

What is a "Ranger Pattern Saddle?" I've not heard that term before.
Bill Kambic

Mangalarga Marchador: Uma raça, uma paixão
Joseph Sullivan
Website Admin
Posts: 3528
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2000 8:35 pm
Medals: 2
Location: USA
:
Society Member Donation - 7th
Contact:

Sat May 19, 2018 11:57 am

I can see trying the rubber horse covers. They probably had flaps and grommets for ventilation. Saddle blankets do seem like a very bad idea. I sometimes use one today that looks like rubber but is a technology with micro-channels that moves heat and distributes weight. No trouble with it in this hot climate.
Joe
User avatar
Todd
Website Admin
Posts: 2458
Joined: Tue Nov 28, 2000 4:10 pm
Medals: 2
Last Name: Holmes
Location: USA
:
Society Member Donation - Origin

Thu May 24, 2018 6:44 pm

wkambic wrote:
Sat May 12, 2018 8:14 am
What is a "Ranger Pattern Saddle?" I've not heard that term before.
Ranger saddles were a fairly specific type of stop-gap saddle that were purchased and used in the first couple years of the war, until supply and quality control issues were ironed out.

The "ranger saddle" was a common pattern type (by that name) manufactured in the big eastern saddlery firms in Philadelphia, New York, Pittsburgh in the 1850s - these were sent all over the world. I've seen pre-CW advertising mentioning ranger saddles as far away as San Francisco and Honolulu.

In its basic form, these were skeleton rigged spanish trees. Not Californias, vaqueros, or Texas tree types - primarily spanish trees.

There isnt a lot of documentation on these as they were purchased in extremis. Their presence in this ordnance record suggests that they were being replaced and put in storage by 1863, as I believe this 'classification' setup was to give ordnance officers some way to account for things they found in inspection tours.
User avatar
wkambic
Society Member
Posts: 1514
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2000 6:44 pm
Medals: 1
Last Name: Kambic
Location: Kingston, TN
:
Society Member

Sat May 26, 2018 11:19 am

Thank you. Makes sense. I'd just not heard of them before! :)
Bill Kambic

Mangalarga Marchador: Uma raça, uma paixão
Post Reply