Comparison and Contrast. WWI and WWII U.S. Organic Cav.

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Pat Holscher
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Tue Dec 10, 2013 9:55 pm

I thought these two photographs from World War One and World War Two made for an interesting contrast, with some surprising similarities.
Brian P. wrote:The photo in the Punitive Expedition thread of Gen. Bell reminded me of this pic of him inspecting the 33rd Division Headquarters troop in France. (Note: he is still wearing his trademark whiskers!)

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From: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=12010
Pat Holscher wrote:This is a photo of a mounted 10th Mountain Division honor guard being reviewed by British Gen. Harding in Italy. Note the 1917 packers saddles. This is one of those photos which serves to raise all sorts of questions in a person mind. Photograph courtesy of the Denver Public Library Western History Collection.

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From: viewtopic.php?f=3&t=990
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rayarthart
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Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:11 pm

Wonder which Cavalry Regiment Bell was Inspecting?
Brian P.
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Tue Dec 17, 2013 7:36 am

The Division's HQ Troop was drawn from the 1st Illinois Cavalry before most of that regiment was converted to artillery. I may be wrong, but I think that I've read that HQ Troop was drawn from Chicago's Black Horse Troop.
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Tue Dec 17, 2013 7:56 pm

Brian P. wrote:The Division's HQ Troop was drawn from the 1st Illinois Cavalry before most of that regiment was converted to artillery. I may be wrong, but I think that I've read that HQ Troop was drawn from Chicago's Black Horse Troop.
The 33d was mostly made up of Illinois National Guardsmen in general, so that would make sense.
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Tue Dec 17, 2013 7:59 pm

Pat Holscher wrote:
Brian P. wrote:The Division's HQ Troop was drawn from the 1st Illinois Cavalry before most of that regiment was converted to artillery. I may be wrong, but I think that I've read that HQ Troop was drawn from Chicago's Black Horse Troop.
The 33d was mostly made up of Illinois National Guardsmen in general, so that would make sense.
As a total aside a famous member of the Illinois National Guard of this period who was a cavalryman was Robert W. McCormick, who became the publisher of the Chicago Tribune. He'd served as a cavalry officer in the Illinois Guard on the Mexican borders and was called back up, although with the rest of the Guard, in WWI, but he ended up on Pershing's staff and then in the 1st Division.
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Wed Dec 18, 2013 8:08 am

Pat Holscher wrote:
Pat Holscher wrote:
Brian P. wrote:The Division's HQ Troop was drawn from the 1st Illinois Cavalry before most of that regiment was converted to artillery. I may be wrong, but I think that I've read that HQ Troop was drawn from Chicago's Black Horse Troop.
The 33d was mostly made up of Illinois National Guardsmen in general, so that would make sense.
As a total aside a famous member of the Illinois National Guard of this period who was a cavalryman was Robert W. McCormick, who became the publisher of the Chicago Tribune. He'd served as a cavalry officer in the Illinois Guard on the Mexican borders and was called back up, although with the rest of the Guard, in WWI, but he ended up on Pershing's staff and then in the 1st Division.
If you ever get to Naperville, IL, there is a great museum on the estate Colonel Robert R. McCormick. Colonel McCormick served in World War I and saw action at the Battle of Cantigny. After returning home, he renamed the estate in honor of the battle. The museum is the 1st Infantry Division Museum at Cantigny. COL McCormick’s home, a few hundred yards away, is open to the public. Both are well worth the trip.
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Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:45 am

Couvi wrote:
If you ever get to Naperville, IL, there is a great museum on the estate Colonel Robert R. McCormick. Colonel McCormick served in World War I and saw action at the Battle of Cantigny. After returning home, he renamed the estate in honor of the battle. The museum is the 1st Infantry Division Museum at Cantigny. COL McCormick’s home, a few hundred yards away, is open to the public. Both are well worth the trip.
McCormick is one of those interesting characters who did a lot of things in life, but his military service seems to have been foremost in his mind. He was a practicing lawyer at one time, and of course a publisher, but it was as Col. Robert McCormick that he somewhat formed his own identity.
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mmoore
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Wed Jan 08, 2014 11:52 am

Colonel Robert R. McCormick was also the Uncle of Bazy Tankersley. Ruth "Bazy" McCormick Miller Tankersley (March 7, 1921 - February 5, 2013) was a noted breeder of Arabian horses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bazy_Tankersley
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