Australian Mounted Service Badge?

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Australian Mounted Service Badge?

Post by Pat Holscher » Sun Jul 22, 2007 8:20 pm

From North Australia Observer Unit by Dr. Armoury Vane:

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">
One of the platoon corporals was Len Taylor, who still has many memories of Flick's Waterhole, which are of great value here. Taylor was a Victorian with Army service dating from 1935 when he enlisted in a horsed militia artillery regiment. He was a fine horseman and a great bushman. His mounted service entitled him to wear the "whip and spur" badge on his left forearm; he was also a qualified Bombardier Farrier."
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What is a "whip and spur" badge?

And what is a Bombardier Farrier?

Pat

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Post by Trooper » Mon Jul 23, 2007 9:29 am

The badge sounds like a Driver's badge and can be seen here:
http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-bad ... illery.htm
about 2/3 rds down the page.

I don't know what a Bombadier Farrier was but possibly an artillery specialist farrier?

Dušan

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Post by Pat Holscher » Mon Jul 23, 2007 9:25 pm

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Trooper</i>
<br />The badge sounds like a Driver's badge and can be seen here:
http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-bad ... illery.htm
about 2/3 rds down the page.

I don't know what a Bombadier Farrier was but possibly an artillery specialist farrier?

Dušan
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Thanks on both items here. That must be the patch, and I think you must be right on the title also.

Pat

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Post by Pat Holscher » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:52 am

Are the patches unique to Australia, or did all Commonwealth armies have these?

Pat

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Post by Reese Williams » Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:23 am

Pat,

The whip and spur is a proficiency badge. They were worn to indicate the wearer had passed a certain trade related qualification. Some were symbols, a set of bagpipes for pipers, a drum = drummer, crossed signal flags =signaler and so on. Some were letters, LG=Lewis Gunner, L= gun Layer, MT = motor transport (vehicle driver), There were also A, B and C patches indicating a grade within the proficiency. They are similar to the USN rate badges.

Bombadier is a rank, bombadier for arty, trooper for cavalry, private for infantry

farrier would be his MOS

So he was an enlisted farrier who had also qualified as a driver.

I'm standing by to be corrected on fine points but I think the general outline is sound.

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Post by Pat Holscher » Tue Jul 24, 2007 4:22 pm

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Reese Williams</i>
<br />Pat,

The whip and spur is a proficiency badge. They were worn to indicate the wearer had passed a certain trade related qualification. Some were symbols, a set of bagpipes for pipers, a drum = drummer, crossed signal flags =signaler and so on. Some were letters, LG=Lewis Gunner, L= gun Layer, MT = motor transport (vehicle driver), There were also A, B and C patches indicating a grade within the proficiency. They are similar to the USN rate badges.

Bombadier is a rank, bombadier for arty, trooper for cavalry, private for infantry

farrier would be his MOS

So he was an enlisted farrier who had also qualified as a driver.

I'm standing by to be corrected on fine points but I think the general outline is sound.

<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Thanks Reese. I had no idea these skill patches existed.

Were these also used in the English (or other Commonwealth) armies?

Pat

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Post by Reese Williams » Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:05 am

Pat,

As far as I know they were used by all the commwealth countries, certainly by the British. I've got a few, mostly WWII in my collection. I'll try to post some photos over the weekend.

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Post by Pat Holscher » Wed Jul 25, 2007 7:23 am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Reese Williams</i>
<br />Pat,

As far as I know they were used by all the commwealth countries, certainly by the British. I've got a few, mostly WWII in my collection. I'll try to post some photos over the weekend.
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Thanks Reese, I'll look forward to it.

Pat

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Post by Trooper » Fri Jul 27, 2007 5:12 pm

A variation on scarlet backing for dress uniform:
http://cgi.ebay.com/WW1-Gilt-Bullion-Wi ... dZViewItem

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Post by Reese Williams » Mon Jul 30, 2007 11:32 am

Pat,

Stand by to be confused. Let me start by saying I too am still confused by the variations of this subject and welcome any corrections or inputs from anyone who reads this. I know we have some very knowledgeable members here so please chime in. I’ve included the Saddler’s and Farrier’s badges to keep this vaguely on topic

There are three groups of badges that all look similar and some even seem to do duty in more than one group. The groups are, Tradesmen’s, Instructor’s and Skill-at-Arms badges. Prior to WWII the badges were made in gilding-metal and attached with a backing plate and split pin. Around 1940 wartime economy caused production to shift to worsted badges. Most worsted badges use a white or off-white thread on khaki wool background.

The first photo shows some of the earlier metal badges. L-R ,top to bottom they are:
Two versions of the Gun Layer badge, Pioneer, Artificer
Musketry Instructor, Physical Training Inst., Saddler or saddle tree maker, Drummer
Bugler, Signaler, Driver, Bandsman (possibly reproduction)

The next photo is of worsted badges with T, I or S to indicate tradesmen’s, instructor’s or skill-at-arms respectively. Again L-R, top to bottom
Ammunition Examiner T, Cook T, Surveyor T, Qualified Instructor I, Mortar Man T
Group A trades T, Unknown, Pioneer T, Musketry I, Range Taker T
Group B trades T, Motor Transport T, Farrier T, Physical Training I, Light Machine Gun T
Group C trades T, Special Pay S, Artificer T, Signaler T, Special Pay S
Best Shot in Unit S

The tradesmen’s and instructor’s badges were worn on the upper right sleeve and were related to what the wearer’s military specialty was. Skill-at-arms badges were awarded by competition and were worn for a limited time, usually two years or until the next competition whichever came first..

Okay , ready for the exam?

Image

Image

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Post by Reese Williams » Mon Jul 30, 2007 11:34 am


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Post by Pat Holscher » Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:36 pm

Reese, thanks!

I'm afraid I'll have to study them in order to take the exam!

I wasn't at all aware of these badges. How interesting.

Pat

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