Cavalry boots?

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John Fitzgerald
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Cavalry boots?

Post by John Fitzgerald » Wed Jun 14, 2006 10:32 am

Here are some new brown riding boots. The spanish tops and swagger tabs don't look very U S Cav. I wonder how much trouble it would be to remodel them? I only post this because brown boots (at a reasonable price) are hard to find.

http://cgi.ebay.com/MENS-Cavalry-Nittan ... dZViewItem

John Fitzgerald
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Jim Bewley
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Post by Jim Bewley » Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:01 am

The wording under the picture sounds like they will modify them for you or perhaps make a pair. Can't tell for sure. They look good.

Jim

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Post by John Fitzgerald » Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:07 am

Plain tops with a little lace detail on the outside would be good.

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Post by Philip S » Fri Jun 16, 2006 7:38 am

I have a new pair of their black patrol boots which have been working out well. I got mine on sale from a local tack shop because a PA State mounted trooper did not like their special order double sole. I thought that the extra stiffness would actually be a help for an injured high arch. The patrol boots differ from the field boots in having a fully lined leg, a different style heel, no spur rest, and are a bit stiffer. They may also be slightly shorter and have a flat top. I suspect that they were intended more for motorcycle than horse mounted police. I have found the lace instep and (especially) the lace cuff to be helpful. They are comfortable to ride in. They are made in Pakistan and I have had no problems with the workmanship.

Their web page:
http://www.nittanyimports.com/

As an aside, they are headquartered about one hour away near Altoona and have taken the name of our valley and mountain (Nittany)...probably because of its association with the Penn State Nittany Lions football team.

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Jim Bewley
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Post by Jim Bewley » Fri Jun 16, 2006 7:49 am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">I thought that the extra stiffness would actually be a help for an injured high arch.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

I was given a pair of top boots that were made in England. Inside they said "H. Batten, Huntring Boot Maker". Very nice and he is still making boots.

They had a very thick double sole and I found them to really give support when you have to stand in the irons on a long run. Better to ride in then walk in.

Jim

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Post by Philip S » Fri Jun 16, 2006 7:55 am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Better to ride in then walk in.<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Absolutely!!!

Pakistan was part of the British empire and since many officers wore English imported boots there would be a plausable continuation of tradition.

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Post by Pat Holscher » Sat Jun 17, 2006 7:40 am

Interesting to see the references here to the weight of the soles in connection with the comfort of the boots.

A couple of years ago an old mule hide pair of cowboy boots I had finally blew out, and I pressed into service a heavier pair I had around for a long time, but which I didn't like wearing much. The other pair had a heavier heel and heavier sole. I thought I might dislike them in part for that reason, but haven't noticed that to be at all true, even though I've now worn them for hours upon end in the saddle.

Where I've never been able to really adjust, however, is to wearing heavy White's winter packers (the "shoe pack" type riding boot). The sole is really think and it does worry me endlessly while riding. Of course, I only wear them when in danger of freezing my feet.

Pat

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Post by John Fitzgerald » Sat Jun 17, 2006 1:21 pm

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Pat Holscher</i>
<br />Interesting to see the references here to the weight of the soles in connection with the comfort of the boots.

A couple of years ago an old mule hide pair of cowboy boots I had finally blew out, and I pressed into service a heavier pair I had around for a long time, but which I didn't like wearing much. The other pair had a heavier heel and heavier sole. I thought I might dislike them in part for that reason, but haven't noticed that to be at all true, even though I've now worn them for hours upon end in the saddle.

Where I've never been able to really adjust, however, is to wearing heavy White's winter packers (the "shoe pack" type riding boot). The sole is really think and it does worry me endlessly while riding. Of course, I only wear them when in danger of freezing my feet.

Pat
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

My Schnee's have air bob soles. I also worry about being "hung up" in a fall. I do use overshoe stirrups with them. They still grip too good. I think the tire tread soles would be better.

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Post by Pat Holscher » Sat Jun 17, 2006 10:09 pm

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by John Fitzgerald</i>
<br /><blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Pat Holscher</i>
<br />Interesting to see the references here to the weight of the soles in connection with the comfort of the boots.

A couple of years ago an old mule hide pair of cowboy boots I had finally blew out, and I pressed into service a heavier pair I had around for a long time, but which I didn't like wearing much. The other pair had a heavier heel and heavier sole. I thought I might dislike them in part for that reason, but haven't noticed that to be at all true, even though I've now worn them for hours upon end in the saddle.

Where I've never been able to really adjust, however, is to wearing heavy White's winter packers (the "shoe pack" type riding boot). The sole is really think and it does worry me endlessly while riding. Of course, I only wear them when in danger of freezing my feet.

Pat
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

My Schnee's have air bob soles. I also worry about being "hung up" in a fall. I do use overshoe stirrups with them. They still grip too good. I think the tire tread soles would be better.

John Fitzgerald
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<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Mine also have the air bob soles, although they are Whites. I would also have preferred the chain sole, but when I bought them I was headed out the very next day for some artic riding.

I have a pair of oversized stirrups that work okay for these, but like you, I still feel somewhat uncomfortable about them. I otherwise really like the boots, and even purchased a set of spurs I can use with them. They are nice and warm, and work out well in all other respects. I just don't want the griping sole. I've almost pondered whether it would be better to have a pair of oversized hooded stirrups to use with them, but I haven't explored that and don't know that this would be the case.

Indeed, I almost feel the sole is an oversight in the design. Granted, I suppose boots of this type get a lot more ground use, and mine are so warm that I've quit wearing any other simliar boot for snowy and cold conditions. Still, a less aggressive sole would be better.

Pat

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Post by dallas » Sun Jun 18, 2006 12:26 pm

Seeing Pat talk about White's Boots, I have a pair of White's lace-up cowboy packers. They came with a heavy double sole, rubber over leather, and being as old as I am, they were too heavy for me to wear for all day. So, I took them to my local bootmaker and had him resole them in a lighter leather sole, about the thickness of a regular cowboy boot. That makes them much better for me. The leather in those boots is about twice as thick as most boot leather. They should last forever. I also have a pair of work boots from Bowman's Wilson Boot Co. in Livingston, MT. Again they were really heavy with the huge riding heel and thick sole, so I had them also resoled and heeled into a more comfortable sole and heel. With those two pairs, two more pairs of dress boots from Paul Bond, a pair of Tony Lama ostrich and a pair of Olathe boots for my 1880 Kansas Cowboy outfit, I shouldn't ever need to buy another pair of boots.
Dallas

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Post by Pat Holscher » Sun Jun 18, 2006 9:52 pm

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by dallas</i>
<br />Seeing Pat talk about White's Boots, I have a pair of White's lace-up cowboy packers. They came with a heavy double sole, rubber over leather, and being as old as I am, they were too heavy for me to wear for all day. So, I took them to my local bootmaker and had him resole them in a lighter leather sole, about the thickness of a regular cowboy boot. That makes them much better for me. The leather in those boots is about twice as thick as most boot leather. They should last forever. I also have a pair of work boots from Bowman's Wilson Boot Co. in Livingston, MT. Again they were really heavy with the huge riding heel and thick sole, so I had them also resoled and heeled into a more comfortable sole and heel. With those two pairs, two more pairs of dress boots from Paul Bond, a pair of Tony Lama ostrich and a pair of Olathe boots for my 1880 Kansas Cowboy outfit, I shouldn't ever need to buy another pair of boots.
Dallas
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Whites are heavily built. The packers I have are an old pair of Chippewas. They don't make that particular model any more, which were very high, like the lace up cavalry boots. The soles are not as heavy as Whites. Given as they don't make them anymore, I'll likely have Whites make me a new pair, when they wear out. I'm hoping they last a lot longer, as I really like them.

Of some interest, perhaps, Whites packers were very popular amongst working riders here about a decade ago, and they were extremely popular with other people who worked outdoors. After that, a lot of copies came in (although the Chippewas I have are so old, that they came in prior to the big boom in packer popularity). Anyhow, Whites were extremely popular for awhile, and everyone I talked to liked theirs a great deal.

However, I've noted that in the past few years most of the working riders went back to very traditional cowboy boots. I've never heard anyone make a comment on it, but now you hardly ever see a working stockman wear packers. I'm not sure what happened, but I hardly ever wear mine riding either. It isn't that I've grown to dislike them, I still find them very comfortable, and when I will be walking as well as riding, or when I will be doing ground work, I still wear them. But for riding I wear very old fashioned high cowboy boots. Most other working riders do as well.

It's merely an observation. But I suppose it suggests that certain items are so well developed for their roles, they tend to occupy it no matter what.

Pat

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