When to quit using old stuff

For any and all posts on physical items that don't fit other specific forums in the Artifacts & Objects category.
John Fitzgerald
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Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:11 am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Pat Holscher</i>
<br />On boots and 04s, it's interesting to note that for a fairly long period of time, the 04 was ridden with service shoes and leggings. The leggings were relatively high, but not as high as riding boots.

Of course, the 04 was also ridden with service shoes and puttees.

Why did the artillery variant have sweat leathers and the cavalry variant omit them?

Pat
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Traces under their legs?

John Fitzgerald
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Tom Muller
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Mon Jan 14, 2008 11:25 am

Yep,

that could be a reason, ours weren't too stiff and that was the way we kept them (with saddle soap).

Tom
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Pat Holscher
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Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:01 pm

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by John Fitzgerald</i>
<br /><blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Pat Holscher</i>
<br />On boots and 04s, it's interesting to note that for a fairly long period of time, the 04 was ridden with service shoes and leggings. The leggings were relatively high, but not as high as riding boots.

Of course, the 04 was also ridden with service shoes and puttees.

Why did the artillery variant have sweat leathers and the cavalry variant omit them?

Pat
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Traces under their legs?

John Fitzgerald
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<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

I hadn't thought of that. That's likely it.

Pat
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Jim Bewley
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Mon Jan 14, 2008 4:42 pm

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">On boots and 04s, it's interesting to note that for a fairly long period of time, the 04 was ridden with service shoes and leggings. The leggings were relatively high, but not as high as riding boots.

Of course, the 04 was also ridden with service shoes and puttees.

Why did the artillery variant have sweat leathers and the cavalry variant omit them?

Pat<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

It is no secret to anyone here that I have a weakness for the strap leggings. Pat mentions that they were not as high as the riding boot. I have not really done a study on this, but they come to the widest part of the calf and I thought riding boots of the same period came to about the same height. Didn't the knee high boot come into popularity later?

Ron: We need your boot book.

Jim
John Fitzgerald
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 9:04 am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Jim Bewley</i>
<br /><blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">On boots and 04s, it's interesting to note that for a fairly long period of time, the 04 was ridden with service shoes and leggings. The leggings were relatively high, but not as high as riding boots.

Of course, the 04 was also ridden with service shoes and puttees.

Why did the artillery variant have sweat leathers and the cavalry variant omit them?

Pat<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

It is no secret to anyone here that I have a weakness for the strap leggings. Pat mentions that they were not as high as the riding boot. I have not really done a study on this, but they come to the widest part of the calf and I thought riding boots of the same period came to about the same height. Didn't the knee high boot come into popularity later?

Ron: We need your boot book.

Jim
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

Jim,

It seems to me the mounted legging is just about as high as M1931's and M1940's. I had a pair. didn't I sell them to you?

As long as your calf is protected, you are comfortable on an "04. The bare calf is what gets bruised and galled.

John Fitzgerald
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Couvi
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 9:16 am

John,<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Pat Holscher</i><br />Why did the artillery variant have sweat leathers and the cavalry variant omit them?

Pat<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"> <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Traces under their legs?

John Fitzgerald
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Ride'm like you stole'm<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

That is a good question. See http://www.militaryhorse.org/poppic.asp?s=22&img=3 The traces on the M1916 breast collar equipment ride even lower than these.

Couvi

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Fear the media, for they will take your honor."</i> Anonymous (<font size="1">He wrote a lot of this stuff.</font id="size1">)
John Fitzgerald
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 9:40 am

Couvi,

I can't get the photo to load, but I'm assuming by your comment that traces are not an issue.

Perhaps horses in draft just sweated a lot more than saddle horses, thus the sweat leathers.

John Fitzgerald
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Pat Holscher
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:04 am

<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by John Fitzgerald</i>
<br />Couvi,

I can't get the photo to load, but I'm assuming by your comment that traces are not an issue.

Perhaps horses in draft just sweated a lot more than saddle horses, thus the sweat leathers.

John Fitzgerald
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<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

I just repaired the entry, so that photo will load now.

Pat
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Pat Holscher
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:06 am

Image

Pat
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Pat Holscher
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:07 am

It looks, from this photo, that it could be anticipated that there'd be rigging under the leg, and below it, so the sweat leather do make sense. Perhaps it's better to conceive of them as fenders in this case.

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Todd
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 10:48 am

To make clear, this photo shows experimental harness, but the trace under the calf of the rider IS the standard position prior to changeover to M1916 pattern harness. I'll have to dig it up, but I have a pic of that trace, which is a leather-covered metal cable attached to a breaststrap - it passes about the same place on most riders legs however.
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 2:07 pm

Or, it could be that the artillery just wanted fenders. They had their own bridles, too, even for individual riding.

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Couvi
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Tue Jan 15, 2008 7:45 pm

Pat,<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Pat Holscher</i>
<br />It looks, from this photo, that it could be anticipated that there'd be rigging under the leg, and below it, so the sweat leather do make sense. Perhaps it's better to conceive of them as fenders in this case.

Pat <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">According to Dick Shepard, Chief of the Field Artillery Half Section at Fort Sill, the fender is to prevent chafing of the rider’s leg from various pieces of harness.

Couvi

<i>"Cavalier sans Cheval"</i>

<i>"Do not fear the enemy, for they can take only your life.
Fear the media, for they will take your honor."</i> Anonymous (<font size="1">He wrote a lot of this stuff.</font id="size1">)
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