Search found 21 matches

by Tony Barton
Fri May 26, 2017 1:40 pm
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: Help identifying uniform in old picture
Replies: 13
Views: 2207

Re: Help identifying uniform in old picture

I would concur that it looks like British service, wearing a late or just post-Boer War field uniform , probably taken at home. He appears to be wearing the first khaki wool tunic which came in the last years of the Boer War, and the cord breeches and hussar boots also match ( though in the field an...
by Tony Barton
Fri Jul 31, 2015 2:10 pm
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: How were these guys actually equipped?
Replies: 5
Views: 2810

Re: How were these guys actually equipped?

That is exactly the film version which is such rubbish.
by Tony Barton
Thu Jul 23, 2015 10:03 am
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: How were these guys actually equipped?
Replies: 5
Views: 2810

Re: How were these guys actually equipped?

The first thing to say about this painting is that despite its popularity , it's miles from what actually happened. The Greys ( brigaded with the Royal Dragoons and the Inniskillings , both of whom barely get a mention because of this bloody painting ) advanced across a road, though a hedge, and gap...
by Tony Barton
Fri Oct 31, 2014 3:48 am
Forum: Artifacts & Objects
Topic: What's up with that cap. . . a thread dedicated to unusual.
Replies: 61
Views: 20382

Re: What's up with that cap. . . a thread dedicated to unusu

Getting back to the cavalry pillbox, it was really just a smartened-up version of the softer and bigger forage cap of the Napoleonic Wars. The circular style seems to have originally come from Eastern Europe, and was sometimes termed a " Pokalem " by the French , and the first ones had a let-down fl...
by Tony Barton
Wed May 29, 2013 1:12 pm
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: The True and perfect seat 1705
Replies: 2
Views: 757

Re: The True and perfect seat 1705

Nice picture.
Those are long boots. Badly redrawn from Newcastle's Art of Equitation, in slightly more up to date clothing for 1705.
by Tony Barton
Sat May 04, 2013 1:17 am
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: Off Topic. . . and grisly.
Replies: 3
Views: 800

Re: Off Topic. . . and grisly.

I think you are right. They were mostly religious extremists ( in modern terms at least ) who wanted to create a theocracy free from interference by state authority . As such they mostly came from the middle class , who had almost no hands-on experience of agriculture , and were thus pretty helpless...
by Tony Barton
Mon Apr 15, 2013 3:19 pm
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: U. S. Salute
Replies: 9
Views: 1649

Re: U. S. Salute

So palm down predates the rise of Prussian prestige in 1871....and all those dreadful pointy helmets . We Brits thoroughly confuse the issue : The Royal Navy salutes palm down , the Army palm forward. If you go back to 1815, they were still saluting with a couple of fingers, like the Boy Scouts. Qui...
by Tony Barton
Wed Mar 27, 2013 2:16 am
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: Postcards of the Royal Artillery
Replies: 17
Views: 2772

Re: Postcards of the Royal Artillery

Because the saddles have felt numnahs attached underneath, which do the job.
by Tony Barton
Sun Mar 24, 2013 11:39 am
Forum: Universal Pattern Forum
Topic: British Cavalry mess tins.
Replies: 7
Views: 4243

Re: British Cavalry mess tins.

John , I think that mechanised troops would have been issued the normal rectangular pair of messtins carried by the whole army after the 1937 webbing was issued. They fitted into the webbing haversack, also rectangular. I think the circular tins went out at the same time as the horse, since there wa...
by Tony Barton
Sat Mar 23, 2013 6:49 am
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: Postcards of the Royal Artillery
Replies: 17
Views: 2772

Re: Postcards of the Royal Artillery

Nice collection, I think they are in training camp rather than in France . One is marked with a photographer from Middlesborough , on the Tees about forty miles north of here !
by Tony Barton
Sun Mar 10, 2013 3:51 pm
Forum: Artifacts & Objects
Topic: Varieties of Bugles
Replies: 43
Views: 19216

Re: Varieties of Bugles

FtValleyPS , That's a single loop trumpet , approximating to the old 18th century and earlier types, or the modern State trumpets. It apparent from all these now intermingling threads that US usage is now to call a cavalry trumpet a Bugle , and for US infantry to use the same trumpet as well , but a...
by Tony Barton
Thu Mar 07, 2013 2:15 pm
Forum: Artifacts & Objects
Topic: Varieties of Bugles
Replies: 43
Views: 19216

Re: Trumpets vs Bugles

Some examples on YouTube :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kutm606Dqb0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kutm606Dqb0

sound quality not so good in the second one.
Properly played , trumpets should take the paint off the wall.....
by Tony Barton
Thu Mar 07, 2013 2:05 pm
Forum: Artifacts & Objects
Topic: Varieties of Bugles
Replies: 43
Views: 19216

Re: Trumpets vs Bugles

The difference is one of length and bore , which gives a different tone and range when sounded. Valves are an addition used for orchestral instruments after about 1850, but are not relevant to the traditional trumpets and bugles. The trumpeter sounds the different notes by changing the tension of th...
by Tony Barton
Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:23 am
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: Civil War cavalry lance
Replies: 23
Views: 4456

Re: Civil War cavalry lance

And, in the smoothbore Napoleonic Age, actually breaking Infantry in the first place. They could be devastating , particularly in rain, or when taking the Infantry by surprise, as at Albuera. Two battalions of a Brigade devastated , the third badly damaged , by Polish Lancers. See also Aliwal in the...
by Tony Barton
Thu Aug 30, 2012 6:36 am
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: Training at Aldershot, 1914
Replies: 4
Views: 1096

Re: Training at Aldershot, 1914

From their shoulder titles,I would hazard a guess that they are probably 'A' Battery , The Honourable Artillery Company , the oldest unit in the British Army. In 1914 they were a Territorial Unit ( that's a volunteer, part-time unit for US friends ), and this looks like their training camp . Artille...
by Tony Barton
Wed Jun 20, 2012 8:49 am
Forum: Universal Pattern Forum
Topic: "1805" British light dragoon saddle.
Replies: 73
Views: 27704

Re: "1805" British light dragoon saddle.

I hope these might be useful. They are not very good, since they were taken through glass without a tripod with a pre-digital camera. http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g53/TonyBarton/more%20dollies/1805-saddle-three.jpg http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g53/TonyBarton/more%20dollies/1805-saddle-R-Ar...
by Tony Barton
Sun Jun 10, 2012 1:30 pm
Forum: Public Forum - General Topics
Topic: Off Topic: World War One Made British Eats Bad
Replies: 23
Views: 6166

Re: Off Topic: World War One Made British Eats Bad

If I might comment , as an Englishman with an interest in historic food..... As far back as we have good information , the 17c, food in Britain was as rich and varied as any in Europe. But how well you ate depended on income. As with most things , it's all a matter of money and education.... Food fo...
by Tony Barton
Mon May 14, 2012 12:48 pm
Forum: Universal Pattern Forum
Topic: WW1 1902 British UP saddle miniature
Replies: 12
Views: 8761

Re: WW1 1902 British UP saddle miniature

And here's one of the first of Cesar's saddles arrived at its destination. A Trumpeter of the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars , Palestine 1918. I've made all the 1/6th scale kit , but it's not all attached here for clarity :~ http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g53/TonyBarton/more%20dollies/Travelling-l...
by Tony Barton
Sat Mar 31, 2012 4:06 am
Forum: Artifacts & Objects
Topic: What color are those brown boots?
Replies: 127
Views: 32189

Re: What color are those brown boots?

Back to the British boots :~ Prior to and during WW1 ,men were issued with two pairs of boots , supplied as fleshout brown leather , very greasy . One were generally kept for parade, and blackened and polished . The other were worn in the field, and kept brown and simply greased with " dubbin ". The...
by Tony Barton
Tue Feb 21, 2012 3:38 pm
Forum: Artifacts & Objects
Topic: Varieties of Bugles
Replies: 43
Views: 19216

Re: Varieties of Bugles

If I might chip in with some British observations on the subject : the reason that there were more than one size or type of instrument was largely musical. The longer the tube , the more notes can easily be sounded. If you look at the original 17c military trumpets , they were long (2 '6" in a singl...